[b-hebrew] Psalm 57

Pere Porta pporta7 at gmail.com
Mon Oct 25 22:53:31 EDT 2010


Yes.
And do not forget a possible root yatam, יטם, as well.

Regards,

Pere Porta

2010/10/26 K Randolph <kwrandolph at gmail.com>

> Dear Pere:
>
> Thanks, you have now widened the search to include a possible טום or טים as
> well as the נטם I mentioned before.
>
> Since I don’t know any cognate languages, for those who know cognate
> languages, is there any root from any of these possibilities that would fit
> this context?
>
> Karl W. Randolph.
>
>
> On Thu, Oct 21, 2010 at 10:59 PM, Pere Porta <pporta7 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Remark, Karl, that our word could also be (theoretically) derived from a
>> root ayin-waw (tum).
>> We find samples of this kind in Gn 18:19; 2Sa 3:10; Js 4:3; Jr 44:25...
>> And also from roots pe-yod: Neh 13:27; 1Ch 17:19
>>
>> Heartly,
>>
>> Pere Porta
>>
>>  2010/10/21 K Randolph <kwrandolph at gmail.com>
>>
>>> Pere:
>>>
>>>
>>>  On Wed, Oct 20, 2010 at 10:37 PM, Pere Porta <pporta7 at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Karl,
>>>>
>>>> 1. Concerning the last question in your message, yes, it looks like a
>>>> Hiphil in a quite similar way of "l'hapyl" (1Sa 18:25), which is from
>>>> 'nafal'.
>>>> But.... it seems that verb 'natam' is not found in Hebrew.
>>>> Then... the hypothesis does not work.
>>>>
>>>
>>> If this is from N+M, then it would be a happax legomenon. If we used the
>>> above argument for every happax legomenon, would we have any?
>>>
>>>>
>>>> 2. No relation with the last verb in Lv 11:43 (which comes from tame',
>>>> to be unclean)
>>>>
>>>
>>> Context leads to questioning this conclusion. Not a denial, just
>>> questioning, putting it in the uncertain column.
>>>
>>>>
>>>> 3. Why are you not fully accepting the usual or traditional parsing and
>>>> understanding of this word as a Qal Participle, plural masculine, of verb
>>>> להט (lahat)?
>>>>
>>>
>>> Context.
>>>
>>> The context indicates that we should expect to find in this place an
>>> infinitive with a prefixed lamed. The form we find has the lamed for the
>>> infinitive, and the infixed yod of a hiphil as of a pe nun verb. Hence my
>>> question.
>>>
>>> To be honest, I didn’t even consider להט as a possibility, as it fits the
>>> context neither in form nor meaning.
>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Pere Porta
>>>> (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain)
>>>>
>>>> Since I don’t know any cognate languages, I raise the question to
>>> others, is there is a word N+M in a cognate language, and does it has a
>>> meaning that might fit this context?
>>>
>>> The other option, are there any alternate readings that indicate a
>>> copyist error?
>>>
>>> Karl W. Randolph.
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>



More information about the b-hebrew mailing list