[B-Greek] EMBRIMAOMAI

Iver Larsen iver_larsen at sil.org
Mon Feb 11 00:37:20 EST 2008


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Bert de Haan" <dehaanaf at gmail.com>
Sent: 11. februar 2008 04:47
Subject: Re: [B-Greek] EMBRIMAOMAI


>  Maybe I can put a bit finer point on it.
> John 11:33 says IHSOUS OUN hWS EIDEN AUTHN KLAIOUSAN KAI TOUS
> SUNELQONTAS AUTHi IOUDAIOUS KLAIONTAS, ENEBRIMHSATA TWi PNEUMATI KAI
> ETARACEN
> and John 11:38 IHSOUS OUN PALIN EMBRIMWMENOS EN hEAUTWi
> Do these verses indicate an angry frustrated sort of troubled heart
> caused by Jesus seeing the damage,death, caused by his enemy, or are
> these verses saying in different words what it says in verse 35:
> EDAKRUSEN hO IHSOUS?
>
> Bert de Haan.

I don't know what is meant by "harshness", but I think you are right in thinking of EMBRIMAOMAI in 
terms of angry frustration. Looking at the other places where the word is used in the NT (5 in all), 
it seems to indicate frustration, if not anger, accompanied by an implied or explicit rebuke against 
those who are frustrating the speaker(s).
It is not related to sympathy or sorrow. It is not caused by Jesus seeing the "death caused by the 
enemy". After all, Jesus has just said that Lazarus died in order for God's glory to be revealed.
I think what throws some readers off is v. 36 where the Jews *wrongly* assumed that Jesus cried for 
the same reasons that the others cried, namely because of the loss of a friend or a brother. John 
clarifies this by recording the lack of faith shown by the bystanders in the next verse. It is this 
lack of faith that frustrated Jesus - as we have seen many other times in the gospels. Instead of 
trying to talk faith into these faithless people as he did with Martha earlier, he now swings into 
action. John has set the scene for the frustrating lack of faith first in v. 21 by Martha's rebuke: 
"You should have prevented this from happening! (Now it is too late!)" The exact same rebuke based 
on lack of faith is repeated by Mary in v. 32. This is totally unfair when Jesus has come to raise 
him from the dead.
Mary was the one who had sat at the feet of Jesus, and she still did not have faith in him. How 
frustrating that must have been to Jesus. No wonder he cries in frustration over the lack of faith 
just as he cried over Jerusalem and the lack of faith of most of the inhabitants, especially the 
Jewish leaders (Luke 19:41). This is the only other place in the Gospels where Jesus cried. When 
Jesus raised the young girl, he specifically told the relatives and friends not to cry (Luk 8:52), 
and when he raised the young man outside Nain, he also told the mother not to cry. The point is that 
when somebody is going to be raised from the death, one should not cry, but rejoice. Therefore, it 
makes no sense for Jesus to cry over the death of a man whom he knows he is going to raise.

Iver Larsen
>
>
>
>> From: "Bert de Haan" <dehaanaf at gmail.com>
>> To: b-greek at lists.ibiblio.org
>> Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2008 14:46:04 -0500
>> Subject: [B-Greek] EMBRIMAOMAI
>> In BDAG, in the section with the third definition for EMBRIMAOMAI,
>> there are references given regarding the "apparent harshness of
>> expression."  M Black, An Aramaic Approach...240-243, C Bonner, Traces
>> of Thaumaturgic Technique in the Miracles...171-181, E Bevan, JTS.
>> These books and this journal is not available to me.  I was wondering
>> if any of you mind telling me something about the apparent harshness
>> of the expression in John 11:38.
>> This verse reads as follows; IHSOUS OUN PALIN EMBRIMWMENOS EN hEAUTWi
>> ERXETAI EIS TO MNHMEION.
>>
>> Thank you,
>> Bert de Haan




More information about the B-Greek mailing list