<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2">Hello All,<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;  Lindas question about wind on the day before I speak on Jamaican orchids in Madison, Wisconsin &amp; Lynns' answer from her Ecuadoran adventure prompted me to speak up as our Society meeting was today &amp; our speaker stressed it again with a S.E.Asian bent.<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;  Most cultivated orchids grow in the Tropics &amp; Semi-tropics where the climate is generalized as"hot &amp; humid &amp; rains alot, always" to someone like me from Minnesota. The fact is that their climate can vary seasonally, with moderation &amp; 1 country is not any where near homogenus in their climates &amp; microclimates, let alone evenly&nbsp;  ""! <BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;  Orchids are extremely diverse as are their habitats BUT, they seem to have alot in common.<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;  In Jamaica, the west end of the island is warmer &amp; drier &amp; closer to sea level with more "tolerant' orchids like Epidendrums ,Brassavolas &amp; Oncidiums than the Eastern higher elevation end of the island that harbours the larger proportion of Pleuros. However they have things in common!<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;  The western lower side gets more frequent "showers/sprinkles" around sunset &amp; common morning fogs/dews rising up the shallow valleys with high temps &amp; "shore"breezes during the day.. The higher elevations mid-island get a little more rain certain times of year but are also subject to more fog &amp; dew on a daily basis, again, with mild breezes &amp; intermittent sprinkles at any time of day but, usually, afternoon. The Blue mountains on the East end of the island are considered cool/cold by Jamaicans- the night temps can get as low as 50 degrees! The most dramatic thing I observed hunting pleuros. is that the day temps can be quite high with high humidity &amp; slight breezes on one end of the island&amp; produce a few Pleuros. &amp; the temps are more moderate, the humidity higher &amp; the winds stronger towards the other side of the island. 7000ft elevations can be windy damp &amp; sunny every day- early AM &amp; sunset being the moistest times.. The clouds building over the west end get stuck &amp; drag &amp; let loose on the east end/Blue Mtns. &amp; really let loose on the eastern coastal towns where, coincidently few orchids grow.<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;  Directing most of the "wind" in your system to generate humidity that circulates in the growing area is much better than blowing fans directly on the plants,BUT, MOST IMPORTANTLY is that there is always gentle movement around the plants that is fresh, moist &amp; bouyant!!<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;  In a "closed system" it is hard to reach an even balance but it can be done. Knowing where your plants come from in nature more specifically than country can help you find the right microcosm for them &amp; understanding their origins can help you "build" the right microclimate...<BR>
Good growing! More later...<BR>
Kathy<BR>
</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"></FONT></HTML>