[permaculture] Trends in America

lbsaltzman at aol.com lbsaltzman at aol.com
Wed Oct 29 13:53:21 EDT 2008


I second that about Toby's eloquence.? I couldn't hammer a nail straight into a piece of wood, but I know how to garden and design backyard?food forests. We grow as much food as possible on our property (88 fruit, nut and seed trees with appropriate understory?stuff)?but I doubt it is 50%, but our town has a growing number of neighborhood exchanges where people exchange produce, seeds and plants which is a better solution.

Furthermore, we have several highly sustainable local organic farms which are highly worth supporting.? We have people very active in our local permaculture community who have no land available to grow food. And others who are doing extremely valuable work and don't have time to make growing?food their main focus.? We have a local engineer who is permaculture trained and designs wind turbines and is planning on working on a prototype of a smaller rocket stove.? He is doing his share even if he only growns 1% of the food he eats.

Larry Saltzman







-----Original Message-----
From: Scott Pittman <scott at permaculture.org>
To: 'permaculture' <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: Wed, 29 Oct 2008 9:23 am
Subject: Re: [permaculture] Trends in America



Toby, you beat me to and much more eloquently than I had in my head.

Thanks,

Scott Pittman
Director
Permaculture Institute
www.permaculture.org
-----Original Message-----
From: permaculture-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org
[mailto:permaculture-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org] On Behalf Of Toby Hemenway
Sent: Tuesday, October 28, 2008 9:52 PM
To: permaculture
Subject: Re: [permaculture] Trends in America


Marjory wrote:
>
> The absolute best thing you can do for your community is to quit 
> teaching until you have implemented a design that provides at least half 
> of your food and income needs, and all of your shelter and water needs.  
Guess I better stop teaching, then. So should most of us.

Pardon my continuing curmudgeonliness, but formulas like that are not 
permaculture--they are blanket prescriptions done without assessment of 
individual needs or resources. Nothing in permaculture suggests that you 
need to grow food yourself. Instead, we need to make sure that our food 
needs are taken care of in a sustainable, ethical manner, and there are 
many ways to do that. Same with shelter, water, and all the invisible 
needs too. A permaculturist always has multiple ways of meeting 
important functions. If someone is a great builder and a lousy gardener, 
it would be foolish for them to beat their head against the wall trying 
to grow food. They'd quickly abandon the whole effort, saying 
"permaculture doesn't work for me!" Or they could build wonderful 
shelter for others and trade or use the income to pay for local, healthy 
food.

Permaculture is not about taking care of your own needs by yourself. 
It's about creating relationships among the parts of a community so that 
the community meets its needs in a sustainable way. And that community 
can be a household, a village, a bioregion, or planet.

Toby
http://patternliteracy.com
_______________________________________________
permaculture mailing list
permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
Subscribe or unsubscribe here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
Google command to search archives:
site:http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture searchstring





-- 
No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG. 
Version: 7.5.549 / Virus Database: 270.8.4/1754 - Release Date: 10/29/2008
7:45 AM


_______________________________________________
permaculture mailing list
permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
Subscribe or unsubscribe here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
Google command to search archives:
site:http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture searchstring






More information about the permaculture mailing list