[NAFEX] PC survival in apples and a question about Assail

dmnorton at royaloakfarmorchard.com dmnorton at royaloakfarmorchard.com
Wed Feb 11 11:32:28 EST 2009


Here are the general characteristics of Assail as given by the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station:

The common chemical name for Assail isAcetamiprid and this material is a member of the Neonicotinoid class of insecticides. Itis formulated as a 70% wetable powder. Assail is stable in sunlight, and stable in a rangeof humidity from 20-95%. It is also stable under high and low temperatures. Thismaterial is rapidly absorbed into the leaf and has translaminar activity. Because of thisproperty, it controls pests on the sprayed and unsprayed leaf surfaces. Therefore, it willcontrol insects feeding on the underside of the leaves, which are difficult to spraydirectly. It is not absorbed by the fruit and has good residual activity on apple fruit andfoliage. This material acts at single site and affects the insect’s nervous system. It causesthe insect to become restless and go into convulsions. This inhibits feeding and kills theinsect fairly quickly.Effectiveness and Activity-Assail is an excellent material for controlling caterpillars andworms, and in fruit it is primarily targeted against codling moth, oriental fruit moth andlesser appleworm. However, this material also has a fairly broad spectrum of activity andwill also control a range of other pests: European apple sawfly, white apple leafhopper,apple maggot, rosy apple aphid and other aphids, spotted tentiform leafminer, and SanJose scale. This material is not very effective against the plum curculio and doesnotcontrol obliquebanded leafrollersGeneral Characteristics and Use- The common chemical name for Assail is Acetamiprid and this material is a member of the Neonicotinoid class of insecticides. It is formulated as a 70% wetable powder. Assail is stable in sunlight, and stable in a range of humidity from 20-95%. It is also stable under high and low temperatures. This material is rapidly absorbed into the leaf and has translaminar activity. Because of this property, it controls pests on the sprayed and unsprayed leaf surfaces. Therefore, it will control insects feeding on the underside of the leaves, which are difficult to spray directly. It is not absorbed by the fruit and has good residual activity on apple fruit and foliage. This material acts at single site and affects the insect’s nervous system. It causes the insect to become restless and go into convulsions. This inhibits feeding and kills the insect fairly quickly.

Effectiveness and Activity- Assail is an excellent material for controlling caterpillars and worms, and in fruit it is primarily targeted against codling moth, oriental fruit moth and lesser appleworm. However, this material also has a fairly broad spectrum of activity and will also control a range of other pests: European apple sawfly, white apple leafhopper, apple maggot, rosy apple aphid and other aphids, spotted tentiform leafminer, and San Jose scale. This material is not very effective against the plum curculio and does notcontrol obliquebanded leafrollers. - Harvey Reissig Department of Entomology, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY



The common chemical name for Assail isAcetamiprid and this material is a member of the Neonicotinoid class of insecticides. Itis formulated as a 70% wetable powder. Assail is stable in sunlight, and stable in a rangeof humidity from 20-95%. It is also stable under high and low temperatures. Thismaterial is rapidly absorbed into the leaf and has translaminar activity. Because of thisproperty, it controls pests on the sprayed and unsprayed leaf surfaces. Therefore, it willcontrol insects feeding on the underside of the leaves, which are difficult to spraydirectly. It is not absorbed by the fruit and has good residual activity on apple fruit andfoliage. This material acts at single site and affects the insect’s nervous system. It causesthe insect to become restless and go into convulsions. This inhibits feeding and kills theinsect fairly quickly.Effectiveness and Activity-Assail is an excellent material for controlling caterpillars andworms, and in fruit it is primarily targeted against codling moth, oriental fruit moth andlesser appleworm. However, this material also has a fairly broad spectrum of activity andwill also control a range of other pests: European apple sawfly, white apple leafhopper,apple maggot, rosy apple aphid and other aphids, spotted tentiform leafminer, and SanJose scale. This material is not very effective against the plum curculio and doesnotcontrol obliquebanded leafrollers.The common chemical name for Assail isAcetamiprid and this material is a member of the Neonicotinoid class of insecticides. Itis formulated as a 70% wetable powder. Assail is stable in sunlight, and stable in a rangeof humidity from 20-95%. It is also stable under high and low temperatures. Thismaterial is rapidly absorbed into the leaf and has translaminar activity. Because of thisproperty, it controls pests on the sprayed and unsprayed leaf surfaces. Therefore, it willcontrol insects feeding on the underside of the leaves, which are difficult to spraydirectly. It is not absorbed by the fruit and has good residual activity on apple fruit andfoliage. This material acts at single site and affects the insect’s nervous system. It causesthe insect to become restless and go into convulsions. This inhibits feeding and kills theinsect fairly quickly.Effectiveness and Activity-Assail is an excellent material for controlling caterpillars andworms, and in fruit it is primarily targeted against codling moth, oriental fruit moth andlesser appleworm. However, this material also has a fairly broad spectrum of activity andwill also control a range of other pests: European apple sawfly, white apple leafhopper,apple maggot, rosy apple aphid and other aphids, spotted tentiform leafminer, and SanJose scale. This material is not very effective against the plum curculio and doesnotcontrol obliquebanded leafrollers.Dennis Norton
Royal Oak Farm Orchard
Office (815) 648-4467
Mobile (815) 228-2174
Fax (609) 228-2174
http://www.royaloakfarmorchard.com
http://www.theorchardkeeper.blogspot.com
http://www.revivalhymn.com
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Steve" <sdw12986 at aol.com>
To: "North American Fruit Explorers" <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: Tuesday, February 10, 2009 6:51 PM
Subject: Re: [NAFEX] PC survival in apples and a question about Assail


> 
> 
> Alan Haigh wrote:
>> Michael Phillips book "The Apple Grower" has a photo of PC larvae 
>> exiting an apple drop so I think it is only the surviving apples that 
>> crush the larvae.
> 
> I was wondering about that. I wondered if some of the "June Drop" that 
> we pretty much ignore contained curculio that continued to develop since 
> those apples have stopped growing.
> 
>>  
>> Has anyone of you tried Assail against PC?  The 3 day REI of Imidan is 
>> becomming inconvenient and I like the fact that Assail is systemic and 
>> supposedly as durable as Imidan.
> 
> I always shy away from systemic things on fruits and vegetables that I 
> intend to eat. It seems that if they are systemic, certainly some of the 
> chemical stays in the edible part.
> I tend to be pretty trusting and if "they" say that the fruit doesn't 
> hurt you after being sprayed with a systemic, I kind of believe it. 
> Still....
> 
> Steve
> 
>
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/private/nafex/attachments/20090211/025611b4/attachment.html 


More information about the nafex mailing list