[cc-licenses] TPMs & Open Access

Heather Morrison hgmorris at sfu.ca
Tue Jan 22 00:12:48 EST 2013


hi Nicholas,

A TPM is what it says - a technological protection measure, a  
limitation on what you can do based on technology. Some common TPMs  
are when a publisher uses TPMs that make it impossible for you to  
print a document, to mark up a document, or to print more than a  
certain amount of pages. With CC licenses you cannot add TPMs to works  
that prevent uses allowed under the license. It's about changing the  
work per se as opposed to how you access it, which makes sense because  
CC deals with copyright.

best,

Heather Morrison, PhD
Freedom for scholarship in the internet age
https://theses.lib.sfu.ca/thesis/etd7530

On 17-Jan-13, at 11:37 PM, Nicholas Bentley wrote:

> Sarah, Greg, Heather,
>
> I have a follow-up question to this discussion of TPM's.
>
> If the file/work in question has has identifiers/fingerprinting  
> attached to it which help identify the right holder, author, CC  
> licensor, ...,  but does not restrict access to the file is that  
> considered a TPM? I assume the identifications, whatever, could be  
> construed as protecting the rights associated with the file but not  
> the file itself. But, does this mean that licensee does not have the  
> right under the 'TPM' clause to remove these identifiers if they  
> don't restrict access? Should a distinction be made between  
> technical measures protecting rights and those protecting access to  
> manifestations?
>
> Thanks for the clarification,
>
> Nicholas Bentley
>
>
>
> On 17 January 2013 17:31, Greg Grossmeier <greg at grossmeier.net> wrote:
> Hello Heather,
>
> <quote name="Heather Morrison" date="2013-01-16" time="13:06:47  
> -0800">
> > One question that I have which comes up with respect to open access
> > works: what about paywalls imposed by a downstream licensor that are
> > not applied TO the work, but rather something people need to address
> > in order to get TO the work. I'm not sure if it is even possible to
> > preclude this - most of us have to pay for internet access, so one
> > could argue that everything on the internet is behind a paywall.
>
> You point to the general underpinning of the issue; everything in the
> world, unfortunately, costs something to gain access to, other than  
> air
> (for now).
>
> It has never been the interpretation of CC, to my knowledge, that a
> paywall (or other login mechanism) was a TPM.
>
> Keep in mind the reason for the TPM clause is to address the DRM  
> issue,
> which prevents people *who already have the file/work* from using it  
> in
> ways that the license allows. It isn't about people gaining access to
> the file/work in the first place.
>
> Best,
>
> Greg
>
> --
> | Greg Grossmeier            GPG: B2FA 27B1 F7EB D327 6B8E |
> | http://grossmeier.net           A18D 1138 8E47 FAC8 1C7D |
> _______________________________________________
> List info and archives at http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/cc-licenses
> Unsubscribe at http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/options/cc-licenses
>
> In consideration of people subscribed to this list to participate
> in the CC licenses http://wiki.creativecommons.org/4.0 development
> process, please direct unrelated discussions to the cc-community list
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/cc-community
>
> _______________________________________________
> List info and archives at http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/cc-licenses
> Unsubscribe at http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/options/cc-licenses
>
> In consideration of people subscribed to this list to participate
> in the CC licenses http://wiki.creativecommons.org/4.0 development
> process, please direct unrelated discussions to the cc-community list
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/cc-community



More information about the cc-licenses mailing list