<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">
1. Rebekah's family spoke some sort of Hebrew-Aramaic.<div><br></div><div>2. Their gods were the gods of the east, and they named their&nbsp;</div><div>children after them. All names from that period are theophoric,&nbsp;</div><div>including יצחק IYCXAQ, which I think is a deliberate corruption&nbsp;</div><div>of איש-חק &nbsp;I$-XAQ or איש-שחק I$-$AXAQ. Recall יששכר which&nbsp;</div><div>is certainly איש-שכר I$-SAKAR.<br><div><br></div><div>2. I will listen to your ideas under the condition that you refrain&nbsp;</div><div>from mentioning any other language but Hebrew and Aramaic.</div><div><br></div><div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; "><font face="Helvetica" size="4" style="font: 14.0px Helvetica">Isaac Fried, Boston University</font></div></div><div><br><div><div>On Aug 28, 2013, at 5:39 PM, <a href="mailto:JimStinehart@aol.com">JimStinehart@aol.com</a> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; ">how Rebekah would have viewed the name ($W.<span>&nbsp;<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></span>Then the meaning and etymology of the name ($W will become clear</span></blockquote></div><br></div></div></body></html>