<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML xmlns:o = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:st1 = 
"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags"><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.23515"></HEAD>
<BODY style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: 10pt" id=role_body 
bottomMargin=7 leftMargin=7 rightMargin=7 topMargin=7><FONT id=role_document 
color=#000000 size=2 face=Arial>
<DIV>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><FONT size=3><FONT 
face="Times New Roman"><SPAN style="COLOR: black">Ezer vs. Ezer</SPAN><SPAN 
style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></FONT></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><SPAN 
style="COLOR: black"><o:p><FONT size=3 
face="Times New Roman">&nbsp;</FONT></o:p></SPAN></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><FONT size=3><FONT 
face="Times New Roman"><SPAN style="COLOR: black">In the English of KJV, “Ezer” 
at Genesis 36: 21 cannot be distinguished from “Ezer” at I Chronicles 4: 4.<SPAN 
style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>Their English spellings are identical, 
even though their Biblical Hebrew spellings are night and day different:<SPAN 
style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>)CR vs. (ZR.<SPAN 
style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>Although we on the b-hebrew list do not 
care too much about the English renderings of Biblical names, we nevertheless 
should care about the somewhat comparable phenomenon of how Biblical names would 
have been rendered in cuneiform writing, for the reasons discussed in this 
post.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN></SPAN><SPAN 
style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></FONT></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><SPAN 
style="COLOR: black"><o:p><FONT size=3 
face="Times New Roman">&nbsp;</FONT></o:p></SPAN></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><FONT size=3><FONT 
face="Times New Roman"><SPAN style="COLOR: black">The oldest part of the Bible, 
if it is a really old written text from the Bronze Age [before alphabetical 
writing was well-developed], must have been written in Akkadian cuneiform [which 
is well-attested in south-central <st1:place w:st="on">Canaan</st1:place> in the 
Amarna Age].<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>Was cuneiform writing 
oddly like English in being unable to distinguish Ezer vs. Ezer above, even 
though the Hebrew spellings of those two names are completely different?<SPAN 
style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>We know that the “Ezer” at Chronicles 4: 
4 would have been recorded in Akkadian cuneiform as a-zi-ri, per Amarna Letter 
EA 160: 2.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>[The root of this name 
is the Hebrew verb (ZR, meaning “to help”, which appears at Genesis<SPAN 
style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>49: 25.]<SPAN 
style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>Note that the first letter there in the 
cuneiform rendering is the Akkadian true vowel A, as Akkadian cuneiform had no 
direct way of recording west Semitic ayin.</SPAN><SPAN 
style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></FONT></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><SPAN 
style="COLOR: black"><o:p><FONT size=3 
face="Times New Roman">&nbsp;</FONT></o:p></SPAN></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><SPAN style="COLOR: black"><FONT 
size=3><FONT face="Times New Roman">We can’t be totally sure of how the “Ezer” 
at Genesis 36: 21 would have been recorded in cuneiform, because that name is 
not in the Amarna Letters.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>But we 
can be quite sure how the first letter would have been recorded.<SPAN 
style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>The aleph/) as the first letter in that 
name Ezer is the same letter as the aleph/)&nbsp;which is&nbsp;the first letter 
of the name “Abimelek”.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>[The 
Abimelek in the Amarna Letters has the same name, and is the same person as, the 
Abimelek in chapters 20, 21 and 26 of Genesis.]<SPAN 
style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>The name “Abimelek” is recorded in 
cuneiform as a-bi-mil-ki.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>Amarna 
Letter EA 154: 2.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>[The root of the 
first half of that name is )B, meaning “father”, as in the names “Abram” and 
“Abraham”.]<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>Akkadian had no aleph, 
just as it had no ayin, so the Akkadian cuneiform of the Amarna Letters usually 
recorded both such west Semitic letters as the Akkadian true vowel 
A.<o:p></o:p></FONT></FONT></SPAN></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><SPAN 
style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></SPAN></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><FONT size=3><FONT 
face="Times New Roman"><SPAN style="COLOR: black">Thus as to the first letter, 
the “Ezer” at Genesis 36: 21 cannot be distinguished from the “Ezer” at I 
Chronicles 4: 4 in cuneiform writing:<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; 
</SPAN>in both cases, that first letter was recorded as the Akkadian true vowel 
A in the cuneiform of the Amarna Letters. </SPAN><SPAN 
style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></FONT></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><FONT size=3><FONT 
face="Times New Roman"><SPAN 
style="COLOR: black"></SPAN></FONT></FONT>&nbsp;</P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><FONT size=3><FONT 
face="Times New Roman"><SPAN style="COLOR: black">The moral of this story is 
that if you see an aleph/) as the first letter of a non-Hebrew foreign name in 
the oldest part of the Bible, if it was originally recorded in cuneiform, you 
cannot tell if that first letter was originally intended to be an aleph/) or an 
ayin/(.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>Why?<SPAN 
style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>Because the Akkadian cuneiform of the 
Amarna Letters made no distinction whatsoever between those two very different 
west Semitic letters, and for a non-Hebrew name, the underlying meaning of such 
name may well be obtuse.</SPAN><SPAN 
style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></FONT></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><SPAN 
style="COLOR: black"><o:p><FONT size=3 
face="Times New Roman">&nbsp;</FONT></o:p></SPAN></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><FONT size=3><FONT 
face="Times New Roman"><SPAN style="COLOR: black">Why is that of critical 
importance to the b-hebrew list?<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; 
</SPAN>Because then one comes to realize that when one sees that the first 
letter in the name of Joseph’s Egyptian wife is aleph/), there is no guarantee 
against the very real possibility that the first letter of her name may in fact 
have originally been intended to be an ayin/(, if that name was first recorded 
in cuneiform [and only centuries later was transformed into alphabetical 
Hebrew].<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>Many people have wondered 
why scholars have never been able to make sense of the name of Joseph’s Egyptian 
wife.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>The reason for that is that 
scholars have accepted at face value the assumption that the first letter of her 
name was originally intended to be an aleph/), since that is what appears in the 
received alphabetical Hebrew text.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; 
</SPAN>But in fact, what was there, originally, was simply the Akkadian true 
vowel A, in cuneiform, which could just as easily be Hebrew ayin/( as Hebrew 
aleph/).</SPAN><SPAN 
style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></FONT></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><SPAN 
style="COLOR: black"><o:p><FONT size=3 
face="Times New Roman">&nbsp;</FONT></o:p></SPAN></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><SPAN style="COLOR: black"><FONT 
size=3><FONT face="Times New Roman">The<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; 
</SPAN>o-n-l-y<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>way to make sense of 
the name of Joseph’s Egyptian wife, “Asenath”, is to recognize that the first 
letter was originally intended to be ayin/(, not aleph/).<SPAN 
style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>That mix-up occurred because of the 
confusion of gutturals that is inherent in cuneiform 
writing.<o:p></o:p></FONT></FONT></SPAN></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><SPAN 
style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></SPAN></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><FONT size=3><FONT 
face="Times New Roman"><SPAN style="COLOR: black">And now here’s the really 
exciting part.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>Each Biblical 
Egyptian name in Genesis that contains a guttural makes perfect sense if the 
foregoing confusion of gutturals in cuneiform writing is recognized, while not 
making good sense otherwise.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>What 
does that mean?<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>That means that the 
Patriarchal narratives were recorded as a written document way back in the 
Bronze Age!<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>Few things in life 
could be more exciting than that.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; 
</SPAN>The proof that the Patriarchal narratives as a written text are centuries 
older than scholars think is precisely the foregoing:<SPAN 
style="mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>each Biblical Egyptian name in Genesis 
that contains a guttural makes perfect sense if the confusion of gutturals that 
is inherent in cuneiform writing is recognized, while not making good sense 
otherwise.</SPAN><SPAN 
style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></FONT></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><SPAN 
style="COLOR: black"><o:p><FONT size=3 
face="Times New Roman">&nbsp;</FONT></o:p></SPAN></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><FONT size=3><FONT 
face="Times New Roman"><SPAN style="COLOR: black">Jim Stinehart</SPAN><SPAN 
style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></FONT></P>
<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><st1:place w:st="on"><FONT 
size=3><FONT face="Times New Roman"><st1:City w:st="on"><SPAN 
style="COLOR: black">Evanston</SPAN></st1:City><SPAN style="COLOR: black">, 
<st1:State w:st="on">Illinois</st1:State></SPAN></FONT></FONT></st1:place><SPAN 
style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></P></DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>