<div dir="ltr">Jerry:<div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jul 16, 2013 at 12:24 AM, Jerry Shepherd <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jshepherd53@gmail.com" target="_blank">jshepherd53@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div>Karl,</div><div> </div><div>First, you evidently don&#39;t know what &quot;begging the question&quot; means.</div>
</div></blockquote><div><br></div>&quot;Begging the question&quot; is a form of logical fallacy in which a statement or claim is assumed to be true without evidence other than the statement or claim itself. When one begs the question, the initial assumption of a statement is treated as already proven without any logic to show why the statement is true in the first place.</div>
<div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">You assume your answers are correct without addressing the questions raised.<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div dir="ltr"><div> </div><div>Second, you are trying to argue two different positions.  First, you want to say that in the pre-exilic biblical books, matres lectiones were seldom used.  But then you want to give evidence of a number of epigraphic texts that have the matres.</div>
</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div style>I had been reading them as consonants, so it slipped my mind that you read them as vowels.</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div dir="ltr"><div>  To be sure, matres lectiones were employed in the centuries prior to the sixth century, but the evidence is that first they were at the end of the words, then gradually came to be used internally,</div>
</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div style>Not evidenced by the examples I gave.</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div dir="ltr"><div> and that things really took off around the sixth century.  But, you can hardly say that matres lectiones only appear seldom in the pre-exilic biblical texts, when in fact they occur all over the place in great abundance.  The fact that they occur in such great quantity is evidence of having undergone a substantial editing process in the exilic and post-exilic periods.</div>
</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div style>You have no evidence for this claim. Not in Hebrew at least.</div><div style><br></div><div style>By claiming this, you show you have less trust for the consonantal text to be original than I have for the Masoretic points to be accurate, which I say I don’t trust. </div>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">
<div> </div><div>Blessings,</div><span class=""><font color="#888888"><div> </div><div>Jerry</div></font></span></div><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="im"><br clear="all"><div><div><font face="times new roman,serif">Jerry Shepherd</font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman">Taylor Seminary</font></div>
<div><font face="Times New Roman">Edmonton, Alberta</font></div><div><font face="Times New Roman"><a href="mailto:jshepherd53@gmail.com" target="_blank">jshepherd53@gmail.com</a></font></div><div><font size="1" face="times new roman,serif"></font> </div>
</div><div><br></div></div></div></blockquote><div style>Karl W. Randolph. </div></div><br></div></div>