<html><body><div style="color:#000; background-color:#fff; font-family:times new roman, new york, times, serif;font-size:10pt"><div>But this is surely not <span style="font-style: italic;">historically</span>
 correct, Isaac, even if it might tie in with present Israeli practice and the 
some of the traditions that fed into it. When the poets in al-‘Andalūs 
worked out Hebrew verse metrics using Arabic ‘arūd, they defined a short
 syllable (what in Arabic would be 
&lt;consonant&gt;+&lt;fatḥa&gt;|&lt;kasra&gt;|&lt;ḍamma&gt;) in Hebrew as
 &lt;consonant&gt;+&lt;vocalized shewa&gt;|&lt;pathaḥ 
ḥaṭūph&gt;|&lt;seghōl ḥaṭūph&gt;|&lt;qāmeṣ ḥaṭūph&gt;. Surely that 
indicates a vowel and perhaps suggests one with different qualities (and
 is a genuine eleventh-century witness). <br><br>As a side issue, it's 
interesting that there's no attempt to distinguish between 'long' and 
'short' vowels otherwise within the ‘arūḍ system. Is it a clue that like
 Syriac vowels the perception of length had vanished, and that the 
'long' and 'short' vowels were only distinguished in quality? Such 
Hebrew speakers were, after all, first-language Arabic speakers and were
 familiar with the concept of vowel length. Of course it might mean that
 the distinction between shewa/ḥaṭūph and other vowels was sufficient to
 satisfy ‘arūḍ and thus any other vowel length was irrelevant.<br><br>John Leake, Open University</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><hr></div><div align="center">'inna SâHiba Hayâtin hanî'atin lâ yudawwinuhâ: 'innamâ, yaHyâhâ. <br>(He who lives a comfortable life doesn't write about it - he lives it.) <br>Tawfiq al-Hakim, Yawmiyyât Nâ'ib fil-'Aryâf.</div><div><hr><br></div>  <div style="font-family: times new roman, new york, times, serif; font-size: 10pt;"> <div style="font-family: times new roman, new york, times, serif; font-size: 12pt;"> <div dir="ltr"> <font face="Arial" size="2"> <hr size="1">  <b><span style="font-weight:bold;">From:</span></b> Isaac Fried &lt;if@math.bu.edu&gt;<br> <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">To:</span></b> J. Leake &lt;john.leake@yahoo.co.uk&gt; <br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cc:</span></b> B-Hebrew list &lt;b-hebrew@lists.ibiblio.org&gt; <br> <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sent:</span></b> Sunday,
 17 February 2013, 21:20<br> <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Subject:</span></b> Re: [b-hebrew] hatef vowels<br> </font> </div> <br><meta http-equiv="x-dns-prefetch-control" content="off"><div id="yiv1119478516"><div>
I do it this commonly practical way: A schwa in a radical letter I consider a lack of vowel, but not in an attachment. For instance, לבבך&nbsp;LBBKA (not LE-BABKA), נפשך NAP$KA, הדברים HA-DBARIYM, בניכם BNEIKEM, ואבדתם WA-ABADTEM. But, בשבתך BE-$IBTKA, ובלכתך U-BE-LEKTKA, to indicate that the letter B is here not radical. So also: ולמדתם WE-LIMADTEM.<div><br></div><div><div style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;"><font style="font:14.0px Helvetica;" size="4">Isaac Fried, Boston University</font></div><div style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;"><font style="font:14.0px Helvetica;" size="4"><br></font></div><div><div>On Feb 17, 2013, at 2:36 PM, J. Leake wrote:</div><br class="yiv1119478516Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="yiv1119478516Apple-style-span" style="font-family:'times new roman', 'new york', times,
 serif;font-size:13px;">are you saying that shewa shouldn't be pronounced at all, then?</span></blockquote></div><br></div></div></div><meta http-equiv="x-dns-prefetch-control" content="on"><br><br> </div> </div>  </div></body></html>