<div>I think, Peter, that the second is true: the vowel remains the same in quality but is said/read shorter and more quickly.</div>
<div>Let us compare אהי where, in Hos 13:10 and משי, silk, in Ez 16:10. </div>
<div> </div>
<div>Greetings</div>
<div> </div>
<div>Pere Porta </div>
<div>(Barcelona, Catalonia, Northeastern Spain)<br><br></div>
<div class="gmail_quote">2013/2/16 <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ps2866@bingo-ev.de" target="_blank">ps2866@bingo-ev.de</a>&gt;</span><br>
<blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT:#ccc 1px solid;MARGIN:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;PADDING-LEFT:1ex" class="gmail_quote">Dear Friends,<br><br>I&#39;m not in agreement with a friend, whether a vowel - say segol - that<br>gets a hatef changes in quality OR in quantity. I was taught that a hatef<br>
vowel only is spoken shorter but the vowel itself remains the same.<br>Is it true ?<br>Can you help me ?<br>Yours<br>Peter Streitenger, Germany<br><br>_______________________________________________<br>b-hebrew mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:b-hebrew@lists.ibiblio.org">b-hebrew@lists.ibiblio.org</a><br><a href="http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew" target="_blank">http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew</a><br></blockquote>
</div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Pere Porta<br>