<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">
I think that the term "tense" is foreign to Hebrew, and is inherently misleading. Hebrew does not have time indicators; there is no such thing in Hebrew as ANIY &lt;–AKAL, with a back-pointing arrow to indicate past action, as opposed to ANIY AKAL–&gt;, with a forward-pointing arrow to indicate future action. As I see it, the Hebrew verb is but a root supplanted by personal pronouns for the actors involved in the act.&nbsp;<div><br></div><div>By a certain agreement, and by a certain agreement only, an aft personal pronoun is used to indicate past action, as in say $ALAXTA = $ALAX-TA, 'you have sent', while a fore personal pronoun is used to indicate future action, as in TI$LAX = TI-$LAX, 'you will send'.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>An English equivalent system would have been: banana eat-I for past action, and banana I-eat for future action. &nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>Isaac Fried, Boston University</div><div><br><div><div>On Dec 5, 2012, at 1:15 PM, Jerry Shepherd wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">I am, however, not convinced that the Hebrew verbal system is tenseless.</span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>