<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2>In a message dated 7/22/2002 8:05:30 AM Eastern Daylight Time, iangoldsmith1969@yahoo.co.uk writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">&gt; Do you mean that you find the notion that the <BR>
&gt; cosmos was created out of water realistic? <BR>
&gt; That the earth was a collection of dry from <BR>
&gt; wet? That daylight was created before the sun? <BR>
&gt; And that it all happened in six days? <BR>
<BR>
If were asigning to God the ability to create matter<BR>
out of nothing, isn't it rather a small thing for him<BR>
to be able to re-arrange the atomic structure of an<BR>
element to make it what he wishes?<BR>
Of course if we were to suggest that the laws of<BR>
science as we know them could be flexible in the hands<BR>
of someone greater than ourselves, we open up the<BR>
possibility of an omnipotent God. We wouldn't want<BR>
that now would we?<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
<BR>
Whether I find it realistic is not the question.&nbsp; The question is, was it thought to be realistic then.&nbsp; Consider the fact that Thales of Miletus who live in the 7th-6th cent. B.C. and founded the Milesian school of philosophy did precisely posit water as the foundation of all things -- see <BR>
<BR>
http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/t/thales.htm#Thales%20says%20Water%20is%20the%20Primary%20Principle<BR>
<BR>
gfsomsel</FONT></HTML>