<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=windows-1255">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2716.2200" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Liz, I already pointed out that what is commonly 
called "Biblical Hebrew" is actually a conglomerate of all the stages of the 
language, synchronous and diachronous, during about 1,000 years (if you're not a 
minimalist), from the Song of Deborah until the Books of Daniel, Esther, 
Chronicles.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>It's roughly comparable to placing Chaucer, Sir 
Thomas Malory, Shalespeare, George Burns and rap songs all under the same 
rubric.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Naturally a language used for 1,000 years in many 
different and isolated places, by many users and for different 
purposes&nbsp;undergoes changes, including changes in connotations of words and 
expressions. Look at dara$ et YHWH in First Temple, and part of Second Temple 
biblical lit. as compared to dara$ le-YHWH in Chronicles; examples are 
legion.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>In my first-year course in using professional 
literature, I give my students a word or expression and instruct them to trace, 
using a concordance, the different connotations and explain how it came about - 
First or Second Temple, poetic or prose, specialized uses, etc.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>How often do we use the word "contumely" today? How 
has the main connotation of the word "gay" changed in the last 30 years or so? 
(Compare with MH gamar&nbsp;30 years ago&nbsp;and now. I can't even use the word 
any more without raising eyebrows).</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Sincerely,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Jonathan</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>--------------</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Jonathan D. Safren<BR>Dept. of Biblical 
Studies<BR>Beit Berl College<BR>Beit Berl Post Office<BR>44905 
Israel<BR></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>"sha'alu shelom yerushalayim yishlayu kol 
'ohavayikh"<BR></FONT></DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV>
  <DIV 
  style="BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: black"><B>From:</B> 
  <A title=lizfried@umich.edu href="mailto:lizfried@umich.edu">Lisbeth S. 
  Fried</A> </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A 
  title=b-hebrew@franklin.metalab.unc.edu 
  href="mailto:b-hebrew@franklin.metalab.unc.edu">Biblical Hebrew</A> </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Monday, May 20, 2002 5:11 PM</DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> nasa' et ha ro'$</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>IT strikes me there are different dialects, then.<BR>Nasa' et 
  ha ro'$ doesn't mean count heads in<BR>2 Kings 25:27. Why does the same phrase 
  have<BR>two completely different interpretations?<BR>Do I need to go to two 
  different BH ulpans???<BR><BR>Liz<BR><BR>&gt; &gt;===== Original Message From 
  "Lisbeth S. Fried"<BR>&gt; &lt;<A 
  href="mailto:lizfried@umich.edu">lizfried@umich.edu</A>&gt; =====<BR>&gt; 
  &gt;&gt; But what will you say to them? :-)<BR>&gt; &gt;I'm glad you asked 
  that!<BR>&gt; &gt;Today, for example, I said, "why does naso' et ro'$"<BR>&gt; 
  &gt;mean "count heads"? It doesn't always mean that,<BR>&gt; &gt;why is it 
  used that way here??? Grr.<BR>&gt; &gt;That's what I said, just this morning 
  in fact!<BR>&gt; &gt; I speak in English tho, that's probably why they never 
  answer.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; Which is, of course, exactly my point. If you're going 
  to<BR>&gt; speak with these<BR>&gt; texts at all, and if their answers never 
  change, maybe you'll<BR>&gt; need to be the<BR>&gt; one to cross the cultural 
  divide and learn to speak their language.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; Or maybe another way 
  to put it is, if you're satisfied with<BR>&gt; talking to English<BR>&gt; 
  translations, you may ask your questions in English--if not,<BR>&gt; maybe 
  you'll need<BR>&gt; to speak BH :-)<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; Trevor Peterson<BR>&gt; 
  CUA/Semitics<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; ---<BR>&gt; You are currently subscribed 
  to b-hebrew as: [lizfried@umich.edu]<BR>&gt; To unsubscribe, forward this 
  message to<BR>&gt; <A 
  href="mailto:$subst('Email.Unsub')">leave-b-hebrew-101906J@franklin.oit.unc.edu</A><BR>&gt; 
  To subscribe, send an email to <A 
  href="mailto:join-b-hebrew@franklin.oit.unc.edu">join-b-hebrew@franklin.oit.unc.edu</A>.<BR><BR><BR><BR>---<BR>You 
  are currently subscribed to b-hebrew as: [yonsaf@beitberl.ac.il]<BR>To 
  unsubscribe, forward this message to <A 
  href="mailto:$subst('Email.Unsub')">leave-b-hebrew-101906J@franklin.oit.unc.edu</A><BR>To 
  subscribe, send an email to <A 
  href="mailto:join-b-hebrew@franklin.oit.unc.edu">join-b-hebrew@franklin.oit.unc.edu</A>.<BR><BR></BLOCKQUOTE>---<BR>You 
are currently subscribed to b-hebrew as: [help4979@naver.com]<BR>To unsubscribe, 
forward this message to $subst('Email.Unsub')<BR>To 
subscribe, send an email to 
join-b-hebrew@franklin.oit.unc.edu.<BR></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>