<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META content="MSHTML 5.50.4913.1100" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>How often do 
poets switch languages?</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>There's no 
theological reason for translators</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>not to 
translate "son" or kissing the feet of the </FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>son, 
since&nbsp;the&nbsp;Judaean king&nbsp;is already labeled </FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>YHWH's son a 
few lines </FONT></SPAN><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial 
color=#0000ff>above. </FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>Mitchell 
Dahood, a Catholic priest, </FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>translates it 
"Serve YHWH with reverence and</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>live in 
trembling, O mortal men!"</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>He reads O 
mortal men with no consonental</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>changes: ne$e 
qaber, men of the grave,</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>or men 
appointed for the grave.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>He compares 
i$ mawet (I kings 2:26)</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>bene mawet (1 
Sam 26:16).</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>To have "bar" 
you'd have to consider the poem</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>to be late, 
Persian period probably is when the</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>Aramaisms 
crept into the language. Levine dates</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>P Persian 
primarily by the Aramaisms in P, such</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff>as 
degel.&nbsp; Dahood believes the poem is 10th century.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=710175104-22032002><FONT face=Arial 
color=#0000ff>Liz</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr 
style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV class=OutlookMessageHeader dir=ltr align=left><FONT face=Tahoma 
  size=2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> Schmuel 
  [mailto:schmuel@bigfoot.com]<BR><B>Sent:</B> Thu, March 21, 2002 11:35 
  PM<BR><B>To:</B> Biblical Hebrew<BR><B>Subject:</B> Psalm 2:12 and Proverbs 31 
  ben/bar<BR><BR></FONT></DIV>Shalom b-hebrew<BR><BR>Liz wrote:<BR>&gt; It is 
  extremely unlikely, that the poet would use ben in one verse<BR>&gt; and a few 
  lines later use bar.<BR><BR>Trevor Peterson<BR>Is that because poets don't 
  vary the words they use?<BR><BR><FONT color=#000080>Schmuel<BR><BR>Touche :-) 
  <BR>I was thinking about this driving back..<BR>Hey dad... c'mon let's go 
  pop....&nbsp; to the kosher deli.. this is my father, can we help 
  them..<BR>How does that sound compared to dad, dad, dad... <BR><BR>Now this 
  may draw gasps here, but, even in translation, the KJV <BR>deliberately used 
  various words (in the target language) to express<BR>the same Greek (or Hebrew 
  or Aramaic word) .. 
  <BR></FONT>----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<BR><BR>&nbsp;Your 
  other post, below, with the explanation about the grammar and the construct 
  <BR>was exactly what I was looking for, a moderately precise explanation of 
  <BR>the "squirelliness" of making claims about how the grammar of a word 
  <BR>in one language would move into another... and with enough of 
  the<BR>actual Hebrew and Aramaic that the claimants (who know much 
  less)<BR>might see that the issue is more of an art than a science.. 
  <BR><BR>Very much appreciated.. the problem is that "grammar claims" <BR>"this 
  is a deliberate mistranslation &lt;blah blah&gt;" are made<BR>not to really 
  understand the language, but for spiritual agenda..<BR>I just happen to be 
  operating in a realm where I see that most every day 
  :-)<BR>&nbsp;<BR>----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<BR>
  <BLOCKQUOTE class=cite cite type="cite">Schmuel wrote:<BR>&gt;&gt;&nbsp; 
    &gt; In Aramaic, bar is used only as a construct "son of" (Proverbs 
    31:2;<BR>&gt; Ezra 5:1-2, 6:14), &gt;&nbsp; &gt; whereas the absolute form 
    of "son" in Aramaic is ber'a.<BR>&gt;&nbsp; &gt; the verse should have read 
    nash-ku ber'a, "kiss the son," not nash-ku<BR>&gt; bar, "kiss the son of." 
    &gt;&gt; I know that cross-language "rules" are very dubious..<BR>&gt;&gt; 
    What do you think of this claim 
    ?<BR>-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>Trevor,<BR>
  <BLOCKQUOTE class=cite cite type="cite">The claim is somewhat muddled. 
    Aramaic, like Hebrew, has three states for<BR>nouns (more than that, if you 
    count forms with suffixed pronouns as distinct<BR>from construct): absolute, 
    construct, and determined. An oversimplified<BR>picture for "son" would 
    be:<BR><X-TAB>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</X-TAB>Hebrew<X-TAB>&nbsp;&nbsp;</X-TAB>Aramaic<BR>abs.<X-TAB>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</X-TAB>been<X-TAB>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</X-TAB><X-TAB>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</X-TAB>bar<BR>csr.<X-TAB>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</X-TAB>ben<X-TAB>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</X-TAB><X-TAB>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</X-TAB>bar<BR>det.<X-TAB>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</X-TAB>habbeen<X-TAB>&nbsp;</X-TAB>braa<BR><BR>Of 
    course, those are only the singular forms. The plural in Aramaic 
    actually<BR>changes stems to match Hebrew. The plural construct, for 
    instance, would be<BR>exactly the same in both. Anyway, what I wanted to say 
    about this issue is<BR>that the claim above--that the absolute state in 
    Aramaic is braa--is<BR>somewhat misleading. It is true that the determined 
    state is much more the<BR>default in Aramaic than in Hebrew. Whereas we 
    normally think of the<BR>determined state in Hebrew indicating definiteness, 
    we could almost think of<BR>Aramaic as the opposite situation--the 
    independent noun regularly appears in<BR>the determined state, unless it is 
    explicitly marked for indefiniteness by<BR>appearing in the absolute. In the 
    Aramaic of the Targums and in Syriac, the<BR>absolute state is quite rare 
    and pretty heavily marked for nouns.<BR><BR>So where I'm heading with this 
    is that I have to wonder whether the<BR>objection is legitimate. True, the 
    absolute state may be rare and indefinite<BR>in Aramaic, but does that mean 
    that an Aramaic word used in Hebrew poetry<BR>would have to follow the same 
    patterns? We know that Hebrew avoids its own<BR>determined state in poetry, 
    even where the sense is clearly definite; so<BR>wouldn't it make sense to 
    see the same thing with an Aramaic word?</BLOCKQUOTE><X-SIGSEP>
  <P></X-SIGSEP><FONT 
  color=#000080><I>Schmuel@bigfoot.com<BR><BR>Messianic_Apologetic-subscribe@yahoogroups.com<BR><A 
  href="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Messianic_Apologetic/" 
  eudora="autourl">http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Messianic_Apologetic/</A></FONT></I> 
  ---<BR>You are currently subscribed to b-hebrew as: [lizfried@umich.edu]<BR>To 
  unsubscribe, forward this message to 
  $subst('Email.Unsub')<BR>To subscribe, send an email to 
  join-b-hebrew@franklin.oit.unc.edu.<BR></P></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>