<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML>
Today's Tiorah portion in the synagogue was Leviticus 16, the Yom Kippur
purgation ritual, and there I found support for the claim that <I>kipper
be'ad</I> means "puify, c;eanse, purge" and not "atone for".
<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; In :ev. 16: 19. <I>wetihero weqiddesho </I>is
used in similar context, like word sequence, and with the same connotation
as <I>wekhipper 'al haqqodesh i</I>n Lev. 16: 16. Also, don't forget Akkadian
<I>kuppuru</I>. I don't have RLA in front of me, but if I remember correctly,
it occurs in the context of the akitu festival. Correct me, please, if
I am wrong.
<BR>As Y. Kaufmann pointed out long ago, the type of sacrifice known as
<I>hattat</I>, of which several are offered in Lev. 16, has nothing to
with sin, put is instead a "purification offering; Heb. <I>hitte'</I>,
in the pi'el, means to purify, and indeed it is used in Modern Hebrew as
"disinfect".
<BR>Chag Sukkot Sameach, to those of you who celebrate Sukkot.
<P>--
<BR>Jonathan D. Safren
<BR>Dept. of Biblical Studies
<BR>Beit Berl College
<BR>44905 Beit Berl Post Office
<BR>Israel
<BR>&nbsp;</HTML>