[b-hebrew] Ssade Can Be Emphatic Sin

Joseph Roberts josephroberts3 at gmail.com
Mon Nov 19 20:35:40 EST 2012


Well in other Semitic Languages such as Arabic the letter Saad (emphatic S
 sound) is used in cognate words to represent the letter Tsade

-Joseph Roberts

On Mon, Nov 19, 2012 at 1:35 PM, <JimStinehart at aol.com> wrote:

> **
>
> Ssade Can Be Emphatic Sin****
>
> ** **
>
> As noted in my prior post, in early Biblical Hebrew ssade/C can be
> emphatic sin.  The most obvious example of that is that the name “Isaac”
> and the verb “to laugh” start out in the Bible being spelled with ssade/C,
> but in late books in the Bible, both are instead spelled with a sin/%.****
>
> ** **
>
> Here’s another indication that ssade could be emphatic sin.  In a post on
> ANE-2 on December 26, 2006, Yitzhak Sapir noted:  “Ezra 4:1 calls the
> "elite (Heb: s'ry [%RY]) of Judah and Benjamin" as "Enemies (Heb: cry
> [CRY]) of Judah and Benjamin".  In other words, a Sin becomes a Sade.  It
> is clear that mockery is involved, but what is also quite impressive is
> that the two letters hark back to very similar phonemes in Proto-Semitic.”
> ****
>
> ** **
>
> Now consider a third example of this same phenomenon.  II Samuel 8: 3 has
> LH%YB with a sin/% (or shin), as opposed to I Chronicles 18: 3, which has
> LYCYB with a ssade/C.****
>
> ** **
>
> So there is a fair amount of Biblical evidence that ssade could be
> emphatic sin, with ssade/C having a sound quite similar to sin/%.  That’s
> a key part of the basis for comments one often sees like the following:***
> *
>
> ** **
>
> “The languages of the Semitic family share a number of features.  One of
> them is phonetic, involving:  (a) the recognition of emphatic forms for
> some consonants -- for example, the Hebrew ssade being the emphatic form of
> the sin or samekh….”  Kamal Suleiman Salibi, *The Historicity of Biblical
> Israel* (1998), p, 10.****
>
> ** **
>
> Jim Stinehart****
>
> ****Evanston**, **Illinois****
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: jimstinehart at aol.com
> To: b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org
> Cc:
> Date: Sun, 18 Nov 2012 09:37:09 -0500 (EST)
> Subject: [b-hebrew] Ssade Can Be Emphatic Sin
>  In early Biblical Hebrew, ssade/C can be emphatic sin.******
>  Consider in this regard the Hebrew verb “to laugh” and the name “Isaac”.
> In Genesis, they’re both spelled with ssade/C:  CXQ and YCXQ.  [The west
> Semitic meaning of “Isaac” is “He Laughs”, but since his mother’s birth
> name is not Semitic, his own name will have as its more profound meaning
> its non-Semitic meaning:  “He Sits Next to God”.]****
>  But in late books in the Bible, “he laughs” and “Isaac” are spelled not
> with a ssade/C, but rather with a sin/%:  %XQ and Y%XQ.****
>  Here are some Biblical cites.  “[He] laughed”, spelled YCXQ with a
> ssade/C, is at Genesis 17: 17.  The name “Isaac” is likewise spelled YCXQ
> with a ssade/C two verses later at Genesis 17: 19.  By contrast, “[man
> is] laughed” is spelled %XWQ with a sin/% [not a ssade/C] at Job 12: 4, and
> “Isaac” is spelled Y%XQ with a sin/% [not a ssade/C] at Amos 7: 9. ****
>  That indicates that in early Biblical Hebrew, ssade could be an emphatic
> sin, having a sound quite similar to sin.****
>  Jim Stinehart****
>  Evanston, Ilinois****
>
> _______________________________________________
> b-hebrew mailing list
> b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew
>
> _______________________________________________
> b-hebrew mailing list
> b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew
>
>
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/b-hebrew/attachments/20121119/529a2423/attachment.html 


More information about the b-hebrew mailing list