[b-hebrew] asherah (purim???)

jimstinehart at aol.com jimstinehart at aol.com
Tue Mar 20 08:19:00 EDT 2012


Kevin Riley:

You wrote:  “Or, as many would argue, the events in Genesis revolving around Abraham, Isaac and Jacob occurred centuries before the Amarna letters were written.  Therefore there is no reason at all why Jacob could not call his son Asher for a number of reasons, a connection with Asherah being only one possiblity.”

(1)  If “the events in Genesis revolving around Abraham, Isaac and Jacob occurred centuries before the Amarna letters were written”, then no goddess Asherah is attested in that early period.

(2)  Moreover, I do not know any mainstream university scholars today who assert that “the events in Genesis revolving around Abraham, Isaac and Jacob occurred centuries before the Amarna letters were written”.  Rather, university scholars assert that the Patriarchal narratives were composed by multiple authors, each of whom post-dates the Bronze Age, and none of whom knew any specific historical events that occurred in the Bronze Age.

I am the one who posits an earlier composition date for the Patriarchal narratives than does the academic mainstream.

Asher is portrayed as being born way out east in Naharim [Genesis 24: 10] in eastern Syria, a locale where the goddess Asherah was unknown.  Both the name “Naharim” and the pagan goddess Asherah were unknown “centuries before the Amarna letters were written”.  Nothing in the received text suggests in any way, shape or form that Asher was named after the pagan goddess Asherah.  

There’s nothing out there to support your way-out-of-the-mainstream claim that the Patriarchal narratives were composed, and reflect a time period that occurred, “centuries before the Amarna letters were written”.  Nor would such a proposed ultra-early date for the Patriarchal narratives be consistent with the pagan goddess Asherah even being known at that time.

Jim Stinehart
Evanston, Illinois





More information about the b-hebrew mailing list