[b-hebrew] k'ehad mimenou

Andronic Khandjani andronicusmy at gmail.com
Thu Nov 3 03:23:38 EDT 2011


Karl,

Thank you for your answer.I would be interested to have your translation if
 אחד   refers to God.

Firouz Khandjani

2011/10/31 K Randolph <kwrandolph at gmail.com>

> Firouz:
>
> We can mention theology, if and only if it is germane to the subject of
> the discussion. What we may not do on this list is to push one’s own
> theology in an effort to try to get others to believe that theology. The
> way I figure it, the people on this list are all educated and have already
> heard the differing theological positions before, therefore to proselytize
> my theology would only offend and have no positive effect.
>
> (One of the things that offends me about another member on this list who
> shall remain unnamed in this message is that in every message he pushes his
> theology, a theology that I reject for linguistic, historical and other
> reasons.)
>
> Having said that, the answer to your question has a theological component,
> which can be mentioned without proselytism. This is one of the verses that
> Christians point to when they teach their members about Trinity and yet how
> that can be a monotheistic concept. I believe that this can be mentioned
> without trying to convince you that this theology is the only way to
> understand this verse.
>
> In this understanding אחד refers not to Adam, but to God. האדם is
> mentioned, seemingly to refer to mankind, rather than just to Adam without
> referencing his wife.
>
> Others claim that אלהים and ממנו are merely the royal “we” and are not to
> be understood according to the Christian reading.
>
> In this message I will not argue for either reading.
>
> Karl W. Randolph.
>
>
> On Fri, Oct 28, 2011 at 7:33 AM, Andronic Khandjani <
> andronicusmy at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Yes, but we are not to speak about theology here. The Bible is using the
>> plural form Elohim for Nisrok, the Assyrian god. This is for me enough to
>> prove that Elohim as the persian Yezdan acts as singular too even with
>>  plural form. We have the form Elohimo too confirming this point of view.
>>
>>
>> 2011/10/28 K Randolph <kwrandolph at gmail.com>
>>
>>> Firouz:
>>>
>>> On Fri, Oct 28, 2011 at 6:53 AM, Andronic Khandjani <
>>> andronicusmy at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Uzi,
>>>> Thanks.
>>>> How you will render Elohim?
>>>
>>>
>>> “God” in this context.
>>>
>>> There are two reasons given for the plural of the noun, one theological
>>> and the other linguistic:
>>> 1) the Christian view of Trinity, which has its roots in Tanakh.
>>> 2) the plural of respect and honor, used also for human masters and
>>> lords.
>>>
>>>
>>>> Why the governing verb is singular?
>>>>
>>>
>>> Because it is recognized that there is one God.
>>>
>>>>
>>>> I think that we must consider Elohim as singular even HE speaks to
>>>> Angels. I
>>>> would maintain the monotheism of the author.
>>>>
>>>> Firouz Khandjani
>>>>
>>>> Karl W. Randolph.
>>>
>>>
>>
>


More information about the b-hebrew mailing list