[b-hebrew] Was the MT for public consumption?

fred burlingame tensorpath at gmail.com
Fri Dec 24 10:19:07 EST 2010


hello Karl;

i see no more speculation in my comments, than your statements concerning
what happened 1400-700 b.c.; or 400 b.c.

regards,

fred burlingame

On Fri, Dec 24, 2010 at 7:06 AM, K Randolph <kwrandolph at gmail.com> wrote:

> Fred:
>
> On Thu, Dec 23, 2010 at 6:34 PM, fred burlingame <tensorpath at gmail.com>wrote:
>
>>>> a. If, in 2010, …
>> b. and …
>> c. …
>>
>
> Your argument is highly speculative, with no way of really answering them.
> There are too many stated and implied “if”s.
>
>>
>>>> Likewise, the language of the leningrad codex…
>>
>
> Why do you keep emphasizing the Leningrad Codex and its times? That’s not
> Biblical Hebrew. Biblical Hebrew is that which was spoken and written from
> about 1400–700 BC.
>
> The Leningrad Codex is merely a preservation of a document that was written
> mostly during that period, with additional marks to aid the non-scholar in
> its reading.
>
>>
>>>> Was the situation different in 600 b.c., when presumably the leningrad
>> codex language was commonly in use? …. So, to say that the hebrew people
>> could understand the words of the tanakh in 600 b.c., without help from the
>> priests .... seems against history. (not to mention nehemiah 8:8).
>>
>
> Slight correction, Nehemiah 8 describes an event that happened around 400
> BC after Hebrew was no longer used as a mother tongue, but was still a
> living, changing language because of its widespread use as a second
> language.
>
>>
>> It would also be interesting to know the literacy rates for biblical
>> hebrew
>> in persons attending american synagogues today, where hebrew books readily
>> available. 50%?
>>
>
> Irrelevant to a study of Biblical Hebrew.
>
>>
>> regards,
>>
>> fred burlingame
>>
>> Karl W. Randolph.
>
>



More information about the b-hebrew mailing list