[b-hebrew] Genesis 41: 1: "Two Years of Days"

K Randolph kwrandolph at gmail.com
Sun Jul 19 08:18:08 EDT 2009


Jim:
You just don’t get it. You continue to present traditions and beliefs that
post-date even the Christian New Testament, yet claim that they refer to the
patriarchal ages. You make claims that have no Biblical or ancient Hebrew
support. You also make logical fallacies.

On Fri, Jul 17, 2009 at 11:58 AM, <JimStinehart at aol.com> wrote:

>  Karl:
>
>  2.  Genesis 7: 11-12
>
>
The “tradition” you reference is a modern one, post-dating anything
Biblical.

>
> 4.  II Kings 22: 3 to II Kings 23: 21-23
>
>
>
> When did King Josiah count as the beginning of his regal years? Starting
from the date of his ascension to the throne? There is reason to believe
from the date of his ascension to the throne, not on any artificial date
such as the nearest new years.

>
>
> 6.  Ezekiel 40: 1;  45: 21, 25
>
>
>
> This is evidence, when even your sources disagree? This is also the logical
fallacy of collapsing contexts.

>
>
> 7.  Exodus 23: 16
>
>
>
> Karl, I’ve saved the best for last:
>
>
>
> “…the feast of ingathering, at the end of the year, when thou gatherest in thy labours out of the field.”
>
>
>
> Again evidence that you don’t know Biblical Hebrew language, as this is a
mistranslation.

>
>
> 10.  Karl, in your opinion, why does the year number in the Jewish calendar increase by one at the fall New Year?  I am surprised that you would reject all of the foregoing Biblical basis for the Hebrews having a fall New Year, in addition to having a spring New Year.
>
>
>
> Because you have yet to give any Biblical reference.


> If a fall New Year is not an authentic Hebrew custom, in your unique opinion, then where did the Jewish custom of a fall New Year come from?
>
>
>
> Modern, i.e. post-Biblical, tradition. This post dates anything anyone
calls Biblical, therefore is not evidence for your theory.


> Jim Stinehart
>
> Evanston, Illinois
>
>
Karl W. Randolph.



More information about the b-hebrew mailing list