[b-hebrew] GWLAT

K Randolph kwrandolph at gmail.com
Wed Mar 26 14:04:28 EDT 2008


Dear Pere:
The word in question has no waw, and since I read it without points, I have
only a guess as to its points as assigned by the Masoretes. In this case I
think the Masoretes were mistaken, which leaves the door open to GLT being
from the same root as GLL. When one has only consonants, one must leave that
open as a possibility.

Karl W. Randolph.

On Mon, Mar 24, 2008 at 9:51 PM, <pporta at oham.net> wrote:

> Karl,
> in a searching work on Hebrew patterns (see below) I found nothing that
> draws near to a word that is built on roots ayin-ayin and has waw/shuruq
> after the first root consonant and taw after the second one.
> The nearest thing to what you suggest is a pu'al perfect, second person
> singular feminine of verbs lamed-taw, with no sample in the bible. But
> this
> has nothing to do with our noun in discussion.
> You will perhaps argue that not being on the pattern list does not mean it
> does not exist. Maybe. But take into account that this search on patterns
> was built up only after a very, very extensive research work.
>
> See ptr 1593 in www.oham.net/out/S-d/S-d.html
> The explanation on this pattern will be on the net within some days, but
> it
> is exactly what I say.
>
> Yours,
>
> Pere Porta
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "K Randolph" <kwrandolph at gmail.com>
> To: <b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 10:21 PM
> Subject: Re: [b-hebrew] Ecc 12:6-7
>
>
> > Pere:
> >
> > On Mon, Mar 24, 2008 at 10:59 AM, <pporta at oham.net> wrote:
> >
> >> You would be quite right if the noun "glt" exists. But... only "g(w)lh"
> >> exists as absolute, as I said (Zec 4:3). Then "g(w)lt" must be in
> >> construct.
> >>
> >> Heartly,
> >>
> >> Pere Porta
> >>
> >> Your answer is assuming GLT comes from GWLH, it could also come from
> GLL.
> > We don't know for certain. That's why I wrote, "We kid ourselves to
> think
> > we
> > know Biblical Hebrew well enough to say with absolute certainty…"
> > When I wrote my dictionary for my own use, I recognized that there are
> > many
> > times that intellectual honesty compels us to admit that we are not sure
> > what are the meanings to many lexical items. We can't even be sure how
> > many
> > there are. While I acknowledge that the Masoretes did an impressive job
> in
> > recording the vowel sounds connected with the consonants written in the
> > text, yet at the same time I suspect that many times those sounds were
> > recorded mechanically without reference to grammar or meaning that those
> > sounds represented. Then many modern grammarians and lexicographers can
> > end
> > up building towers of words upon a faulty foundation. I have seen many
> > times, some even on this list, where a complex, difficult to understand
> > sentence can be reduced to a simple, easily understood one by changing
> one
> > or two points.
> >
> > Back to GLT, does it exist as an absolute noun? I learned long ago that
> > Gesenius and BDB cannot be trusted and that the Masoretic points are
> often
> > wrong ("often" in my book is as few as one in a hundred). In the context
> > of
> > the closing sections of the preceding verse, it is my understanding that
> > we
> > are dealing with an already dead body, being prepared for burial and the
> > burial itself. Hence GLT refers to the rolling of the body while
> wrapping
> > it
> > in burial cloths.
> >
> > Yours, Karl W. Randolph.
> > _______________________________________________
> > b-hebrew mailing list
> > b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org
> > http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew
> >
>
>


More information about the b-hebrew mailing list