[b-hebrew] Dinah raped?

JAMES CHRISTIAN READ JCR128 at student.anglia.ac.uk
Fri Jul 20 15:53:15 EDT 2007


Hi Harold,

see comments below:

Dear James,
> Hi Micheal,
>
> this is something I've thought about before in the past.
> There doesn't seem to be any linguistic evidence that I've 
> seen that indicates any element of force. Dinah went to 
> see him. Not him to Dinah. 

HH:The text does not say that Dinah went to see him. She went out to see 
the "daughters of the land." They might include Shechem's relatives.

JCR: Good point.


> Also it would take an incredibly
> stupid bloke, when approached by a recently victim's brother, 
> that would believe the proposition 'If you cut your foreskin
> off I'll let you marry my sister'.
>   

HH: The Canaanites were sexually immoral, so they would not necessarily 
see the proposition as insincere.

JCR: Another good point. Please bear in mind that at 
this point I am not committing to either interpretation.
I am merely pointing out that in the face of decisive 
linguistic evidence they are both valid and that there 
are a number of contextual clues that support the one 
over the other.

e.g. Consider verse 7

NWT Genesis 34:7
'And the sons of Jacob came in from the field as soon as they heard of it; and the men became hurt in their feelings and they grew very angry, because he had committed a disgraceful folly against Israel in lying down with Jacob’s daughter, whereas nothing like that ought to be done.'

Note that no mention of force is included when 
why her brothers were angry. It is the mere thought of 
their unmarried sister having extra marital sex.

Further consider their response in verse 31 when being 
reprised by Isreal for their actions:

“Ought anyone to treat our sister like a prostitute?”

What are prostitutes better known for in Tanakh?
For being forced to have sex?
Or for having immoral extra-marital sex?

However, one contextual point seems to stand in favour 
of an element of force. And that is why does there 
seem to be a complete lack of any indication of 
responsibility on Dinah's shoulders? Why aren't her 
brothers angry with her for acting 'like a prostitue'?
 feelings and they grew very angry, because he had committed a disgraceful folly against Israel in lying down with Jacob’s daughter, whereas nothing like that ought to be done.'

Note that no mention of force is included when 
why her brothers were angry. It is the mere thought of 
their unmarried sister having extra marital sex.

Further consider their response in verse 31 when being 
reprised by Isreal for their actions:

“Ought anyone to treat our sister like a prostitute?”

What are prostitutes better k




More information about the b-hebrew mailing list