[b-hebrew] The Name "Joseph"

pporta at oham.net pporta at oham.net
Mon Dec 31 13:32:46 EST 2007


(Jim)
> The name “Joseph” has the following odd meaning:  “gathered, added”.

(Pere)
You are mistaken at saying that the meaning "gathered, added" is odd. It is
not odd; it is just the meaning of the word "Joseph".

Look at www.oham.net/out/P-d/P-d170p.html
and at www.oham.net/out/P-d/P-d179.html as well

Pere Porta
Barcelona (Spain)


Why
> did his mother Rachel give her firstborn son such an odd name?  Rachel
> knew
> that her sister Leah had given Leah’s fourth son the magnificent name
> “Judah”,
> which as previously discussed means “praise YHWH”.  Why didn’t Rachel try
> to
> come up with an even more magnificent name for Rachel’s own son?
>
> One of the key issues for us to keep in mind here is to try to figure out
> why
> Rachel gives her son the odd name “Joseph”, which means “gathered, added”.
>
> Here is the text where Rachel gives her son the name “Joseph”:
>
> “And she conceived, and bore a son, and said:  'God hath taken away
> [gathered/)SP] my reproach.'  And she called his name Joseph [YWSP],
> saying:  'The LORD
> [YHWH] add [YSP] to me another son.'”  Genesis 30: 23-24
>
> The three key words here, in order of their appearance above, are:
>
> (1)  aleph samekh peh/)SP = “gather” (or “collect” or “assemble”).
> Occasionally, this word can mean “taken away” or “remove”, in the sense of
>> gathered and taken away” or “gathered and removed”.  Yet the fundamental
> meaning is
> “gather”.
>
> (2)  yod vav samekh peh/YWSP = “Joseph”
>
> (3)  yod-samekh-peh/YSP = “add”
>
> All three of these words feature samekh-peh/SP as their last two letters,
> which are true consonants.  Aleph, yod and vav can be vowel-type sounds,
> and as
> such can be mixed and matched for punning purposes.  Yet having said that,
> it
> is clear that the last two words are a much closer linguistic match than
> the
> first word.  The words “Joseph”/YWSP and “add”/YSP are about as close as
> two
> Hebrew words can be and still have different spellings, with a different
> number
> of letters.  This suggests that the primary meaning of the name “Joseph”
> is
> likely “added”.
>
> Once again, note that the name “Joseph” is an explicit pun on two words,
> not
> just on one word.  For each name we have looked at -- “Reuben”, “Simeon”,
>> Levi”, “Judah” and now “Joseph” -- that has been the case.  Each name is a
> pun on at least two words, and is never a simple pun on a single word.
>
> So the name “Joseph” means “gathered, added”.  Why such a circumspect
> name?
> What not a glorious name, like “Judah”/”praise YHWH”?
>
> Is Rachel choosing a carefully designed name here, that is carefully
> crafted
> to give her blood son Joseph the best shot at being named to be the leader
> of
> the next generation of monotheists?  Or is Rachel fumbling in the dark,
> choosing an inauspicious name for no apparent reason?
>
> As we will come to see, “Joseph” is the best name that Rachel could have
> given to her son under the circumstances.  First and foremost, this name
> was
> cleverly designed by Rachel to give her beloved son a shot at being named
> the le
> ader of the next generation of the new monotheists.  Rachel well knew the
> story
> of Ishmael’s sad fate.  Rachel was trying her best to distinguish Rachel’s
> son
> ’s situation from Ishmael’s situation.  Alas, that would not prove to be
> possible.
>
> In later posts, we will examine three levels of meaning of “Joseph”, based
> on the two explicit puns on that name in the text.  As always, the first
> level
> relates to the immediate circumstances of this son’s birth.  The second
> level
> will then, as has usually been the case before, reflect the most important
> action in this son’s life.  But uniquely with the name “Joseph”, there
> will be a
> critical third level of meaning:  Rachel’s ultimately unsuccessful attempt
> to
> distinguish her son’s situation from that of exiled Ishmael.
>
> If we can understand the name “Joseph”, we can thereby understand much of
> the Patriarchal narratives.
>
> Jim Stinehart
> Evanston, Illinois
>
>
>
>
> **************************************See AOL's top rated recipes
> (http://food.aol.com/top-rated-recipes?NCID=aoltop00030000000004)
> _______________________________________________
> b-hebrew mailing list
> b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew
>

----- Original Message ----- 
From: <JimStinehart at aol.com>
To: <b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: Monday, December 31, 2007 4:14 PM
Subject: [b-hebrew] The Name "Joseph"


>
> The name “Joseph” has the following odd meaning:  “gathered, added”.  Why
> did his mother Rachel give her firstborn son such an odd name?  Rachel 
> knew
> that her sister Leah had given Leah’s fourth son the magnificent name 
> “Judah”,
> which as previously discussed means “praise YHWH”.  Why didn’t Rachel try 
> to
> come up with an even more magnificent name for Rachel’s own son?
>
> One of the key issues for us to keep in mind here is to try to figure out 
> why
> Rachel gives her son the odd name “Joseph”, which means “gathered, added”.
>
> Here is the text where Rachel gives her son the name “Joseph”:
>
> “And she conceived, and bore a son, and said:  'God hath taken away
> [gathered/)SP] my reproach.'  And she called his name Joseph [YWSP], 
> saying:  'The LORD
> [YHWH] add [YSP] to me another son.'”  Genesis 30: 23-24
>
> The three key words here, in order of their appearance above, are:
>
> (1)  aleph samekh peh/)SP = “gather” (or “collect” or “assemble”).
> Occasionally, this word can mean “taken away” or “remove”, in the sense of 
>> gathered and taken away” or “gathered and removed”.  Yet the fundamental 
> meaning is
> “gather”.
>
> (2)  yod vav samekh peh/YWSP = “Joseph”
>
> (3)  yod-samekh-peh/YSP = “add”
>
> All three of these words feature samekh-peh/SP as their last two letters,
> which are true consonants.  Aleph, yod and vav can be vowel-type sounds, 
> and as
> such can be mixed and matched for punning purposes.  Yet having said that, 
> it
> is clear that the last two words are a much closer linguistic match than 
> the
> first word.  The words “Joseph”/YWSP and “add”/YSP are about as close as 
> two
> Hebrew words can be and still have different spellings, with a different 
> number
> of letters.  This suggests that the primary meaning of the name “Joseph” 
> is
> likely “added”.
>
> Once again, note that the name “Joseph” is an explicit pun on two words, 
> not
> just on one word.  For each name we have looked at -- “Reuben”, “Simeon”, 
>> Levi”, “Judah” and now “Joseph” -- that has been the case.  Each name is a
> pun on at least two words, and is never a simple pun on a single word.
>
> So the name “Joseph” means “gathered, added”.  Why such a circumspect 
> name?
> What not a glorious name, like “Judah”/”praise YHWH”?
>
> Is Rachel choosing a carefully designed name here, that is carefully 
> crafted
> to give her blood son Joseph the best shot at being named to be the leader 
> of
> the next generation of monotheists?  Or is Rachel fumbling in the dark,
> choosing an inauspicious name for no apparent reason?
>
> As we will come to see, “Joseph” is the best name that Rachel could have
> given to her son under the circumstances.  First and foremost, this name 
> was
> cleverly designed by Rachel to give her beloved son a shot at being named 
> the le
> ader of the next generation of the new monotheists.  Rachel well knew the 
> story
> of Ishmael’s sad fate.  Rachel was trying her best to distinguish Rachel’s 
> son
> ’s situation from Ishmael’s situation.  Alas, that would not prove to be
> possible.
>
> In later posts, we will examine three levels of meaning of “Joseph”, based
> on the two explicit puns on that name in the text.  As always, the first 
> level
> relates to the immediate circumstances of this son’s birth.  The second 
> level
> will then, as has usually been the case before, reflect the most important
> action in this son’s life.  But uniquely with the name “Joseph”, there 
> will be a
> critical third level of meaning:  Rachel’s ultimately unsuccessful attempt 
> to
> distinguish her son’s situation from that of exiled Ishmael.
>
> If we can understand the name “Joseph”, we can thereby understand much of
> the Patriarchal narratives.
>
> Jim Stinehart
> Evanston, Illinois
>
>
>
>
> **************************************See AOL's top rated recipes
> (http://food.aol.com/top-rated-recipes?NCID=aoltop00030000000004)
> _______________________________________________
> b-hebrew mailing list
> b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew
> 




More information about the b-hebrew mailing list