[b-hebrew] Amarna Letters

JimStinehart at aol.com JimStinehart at aol.com
Tue Dec 25 14:07:07 EST 2007


 
Kenneth Greifer: 
    1.  Death of the Leader of Shechem
Both in the secular history of the mid-14th century BCE and in  chapter 34 of 
Genesis, the leader of Shechem makes a goodwill gesture toward the  new 
monotheists, which he realizes leaves him temporarily vulnerable.  In secular 
history, Lab’ayu agreed to go  meet with pharaoh Akhenaten in Egypt to try to 
explain Lab’ayu’s controversial,  expansionist actions as the leader of Shechem.  
On his way to Egypt, when he assumed he  had a right of safe conduct, Lab’ayu 
was killed by men of Jenin, who were  pro-Akhenaten, but who acted without 
having received any orders from  Akhenaten.  Likewise, in chapter 34  of Genesis, 
Jacob’s sons take their morally questionable actions against the  temporarily 
vulnerable leader of Shechem without having received any orders from  Jacob. 
The most concise mention of Lab’ayu’s death in the Amarna Letters is at  
#280: 30-35: 
“Lab’ayu, who used to take our towns, is dead….” 
    1.  Consorting with the  Habiru/Hebrews
The Amarna Letters never use the word “Hebrews”, but they frequently use  
the word “habiru” or “‘Apiru”.  All  these terms refer to tent-dwelling people 
in Canaan. 
Lab’ayu, the leader of Shechem in secular history, seems to take the  words 
right out of the mouth of Hamor, the leader of Shechem in chapter 34 of  
Genesis, when Lab’ayu writes to Akhenaten (the equivalent of Jacob, in the sense  
that each is the first historical leader of a monotheistic people) at #254:  
30-37: 
“I did not know that my son was consorting with the ‘Apiru.” 
Those very words would fit perfectly into Genesis 34: 8. 
    1.  318 Good Men Mustered from Southeastern Canaan  for First Monotheist
The number 318 is a very peculiar number.  I have never seen it anywhere  
else. 
At Genesis 14: 14, we read that exactly 318 good men are mustered from  
southeastern Canaan for the good cause of the first historical monotheist.  (In the 
Bible, Abraham is the first  historical monotheist.) 
In Amarna Letter #287: 53-59, per William Moran’s footnote #18 at p. 300,  we 
read that exactly 318 good men are mustered from southeastern Canaan for the  
good cause of the first historical monotheist.  (In secular history, 
Akhenaten is the  first historical monotheist.) 
    1.  Conclusion
There are too many striking “coincidences” like this.  In my controversial 
opinion, the first  historical Hebrew lived in the mid-14th century BCE, and 
his world  was the same world as the world of the Amarna Letters.  The foregoing 
items cannot possibly be  fiction ginned up by four Hebrew ghostwriters in 
the mid-1st  millennium BCE, per the Wellhausen JEPD theory of the case.  No 
way. 
Jim Stinehart 
Evanston, Illinois



**************************************See AOL's top rated recipes 
(http://food.aol.com/top-rated-recipes?NCID=aoltop00030000000004)



More information about the b-hebrew mailing list