[b-hebrew] Did anyone write "Iaoue" before 1863 A.D. ?

Harold Holmyard hholmyard at ont.com
Sun Jan 8 15:48:56 EST 2006


Dear David,

>Gerard Gertoux has provided me with page  80 of what he refers to as 
> "the last critical edition of the text of Clement of Alexandria"
>
>  
>
>(A. le Boulluee - /Les Strommates V,VI:34,5
> in: Sources chretiennes n 278, Paris 1981 Ed Cerf pp. 80,81)" 
>  
>
>
>This critical Greek edition [written in 1981] quotes Clement of
>Alexandria as writing Iaoue in his Greek Stromata Book V.
>
>This critical Greek edition notes that Greek Codex Laurentianus V 3
>[written in the 11th century] says that Clement wrote "Iaou" not "Iaoue"
>in his Greek Stromata Book V.
>

HH: Thanks for following up on this question of yours and sharing the 
results. A question that comes to mind when reading the above is what 
Codex Laurentianus is. If it's an edition of the Strommata, does it just 
say "IAOU," or does it have a note saying that he wrote IAOU and not 
IAOUE? Or is it something else?

> 
>
>This critical Greek edition notes that O. Stahlin has written a a Greek
>edition of the Clement's Stromata [written in about 1905 and revised in
>1960]  that also says that Clement wrote "Iaoue".
>
>This critical Greek edition notes that there is a catena [Coisl. 113 fol.
>368v] that quotes Clement as writing "Iaoue". 
>
>The following catenas are said to preserve "Iaoue" :
>
>Monac. gr. 9
>Monac. gr. 82
>Paris. gr. 1825
>Paris. gr. 1888
>Coislianus 133 [noted above]
>Taurin. III, 50
>
>It is difficult to find any information about any of these 6 catenas.
>
>The question arises how solid is the evidence presented in:
>
>(A. le Boulluee - /Les Strommates V,VI:34,5
> in: Sources chretiennes n 278, Paris 1981 Ed Cerf pp. 80,81)" 
>
>It is written by a Greek scholar, who quotes an undated catena  that says
>that  Clement wrote "Iaoue",
>but also quotes  Greek Codex Laurentianus V 3 [dated as written in the
>11th century] which says that Clement wrote "Iaou" not "Iaoue".
>  
>

HH: If you're interested in the pronunciation, you might want to ask at 
the B-Greek site what the pronunciation of IAOUE (and perhaps IAOU) 
would have been at the time of Clement of Alexandria, if we have any 
idea. It is surprising what the B-Greek people say about the sound of 
the letters, and the ancients often sounded them differently than we 
might think by looking at them. The pronunciation of the Greek alphabet 
is a big topic at that site because of the different systems that are 
currently in use (Erasmian and modern Greek being two systems).

Yours,
Harold Holmyard




More information about the b-hebrew mailing list