[b-hebrew] Yom in Biblical and Rabbinic Texts

Shoshanna Walker rosewalk at concentric.net
Fri Oct 28 09:09:45 EDT 2005


Similarly, "yom" could have just meant a cycle of some sort, and 
later, people could have read "day" into that, since the cycle was 
connected with light and dark, which could have just been spiritual 
light, and not daylight

Shoshanna



Peter wrote "viewed from a viewpoint on earth" but no human was on Earth the
first days. So can we translate "bereshit" (Gen 1:1) as "in a beginning", i.e.
God was the only One Who could observe His creation?

Jan Pieter van de Giessen

On Wed, 26 Oct 2005 14:47:34 +0200, Yigal Levin wrote
> Hi Peter,
>
> This might be getting out of bounds for this list, but that was my
> point exactly. Understanding the word "day" in the Creation story in
> any literal sense does not work. Once you have to invent "clouds
> that hid the sun", you're already adding elements that are not in
> the text. This is good midrash, but certainly not a literal
> understanding of the text.
>
> Yigal
>

>> One rather obvious suggestion is that the creation is viewed from a
>> viewpoint on earth. At first, perhaps, the earth was covered by clouds
>> (and geologists agree with this) so that the sun would not have been
>> visible, but there would still have been day and night. Only later, on the
>> third "day", the clouds cleared and the sun, moon and stars became
>> visible.
>

_______________________________________________
b-hebrew mailing list
b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew


---------------------------------
  Yahoo! FareChase - Search multiple travel sites in one click.
_______________________________________________
b-hebrew mailing list
b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew



More information about the b-hebrew mailing list