[b-hebrew] TT:NAH in Ps 8 a corruption?

kgraham0938 at comcast.net kgraham0938 at comcast.net
Thu Mar 24 11:37:08 EST 2005


Hey what does everyone think about Psalm 8:1

'A$ER TT:NAH HODKA, do you think this [TT:NAH]is a corruption of the second masculine NTTH or imperfect TTN.

Because this translation I am getting "in all the earth which gives you honor upon the heavens."  And that is not making sense.  This imperative is throwing me off here.

--
Kelton Graham 
KGRAHAM0938 at comcast.net

-------------- Original message -------------- 

> ----- Original Message Follows ----- 
> From: "wattswestmaas" 
> To: "B-Hebrew" 
> Subject: [b-hebrew] Psalm 2:11 
> Date: Thu, 24 Mar 2005 15:31:34 -0000 
> 
> > Hallo 
> > 
> > Psalm 2:11 
> > NaSHKu-VaR ? This is a five part question. 
> > 
> > Absolutely Nowhere in Gesenius or van de merwe grammar 
> > books can I find infornation about two masoretic signs 
> > that are written here: 
> > 
> > 1. the first is the peculiar sign above the 'bet' in 
> > this phrase. 
> 
> You should get William Scott's Simplified Guide to BHS, 
> which explains the various accent marks and textual sigla. 
> It also provides glosses for the Aramaic in the Masora and 
> Latin in the textual notes. Having said that, I don't have 
> mine handy at the moment, but this is some type of accent 
> mark. Note that there is a different accenting system for 
> Psalms (and Job and Proverbs, I think) from the other books. 
> > 
> > 2. and what do these circles above letters mean that i 
> > keep coming accross? 
> 
> The circles reference the masora in the outer margins. The 
> first circle (from right to left) on the line references the 
> first note (from top to bottom); the notes are divided by 
> what look like periods. 
> > 
> [snipped] 
> > 
> > 5. since the psalmist a few verses earlier uses 'BeN' 
> > for son, then I wonder why he switches from hebrew to 
> > aramaic in the middle of this psalm, unless he really 
> > wants his readers to understand something other than 
> > 'son'? 
> 
> Or he might be using it for poetic effect. Foreign words, or 
> more often words that are more widely attested in cognate 
> languages but were apparently rare in BH, are common in 
> poetry. Part of what makes Shakespeare so difficult to read 
> is that he exploited the different dialects of English to 
> multiply vocabulary. 
> 
> Trevor Peterson 
> CUA/Semitics 
> _______________________________________________ 
> b-hebrew mailing list 
> b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org 
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew 


More information about the b-hebrew mailing list