4 Misc. Questions (biliteral roots?)

Gary Amirault gamirault at ktis.net
Thu Sep 30 15:36:12 EDT 1999


What is a good simple book which explains how exaggerative and figurative
the Hebrew language is?

Gary Amirault
Dew From Mount Hermon, Editor
tentmaker at ktis.net

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Søren Holst [mailto:sh at teol.ku.dk]
> Sent: Thursday, September 30, 1999 2:20 PM
> To: Biblical Hebrew
> Subject: SV: 4 Misc. Questions (biliteral roots?)
>
>
> Good evening
>
> There's a little about it in E.Y. Kutscher "A history of the Hebrew
> Language" p. 6, with references to Ullendorf's article "What is a Semitic
> language?" + the classical works of Bergstrasser, Th. Noldeke's "Neue
> Beitrage zur semitischen Sprachwissenschaft" (1910) and J.H. Greenberg in
> "Word" 6 (1950). Don't have time to go hunting for any of it
> right now, but
> thought I'd pass it on.
>
> shalom uvrakha
> Soren Holst
> Copenhagen
>
> > -----Oprindelig meddelelse-----
> > Fra:	peter_kirk at sil.org [SMTP:peter_kirk at sil.org]
> > Sendt:	1. oktober 1999 00:39
> > Til:	Biblical Hebrew
> > Emne:	Re: 4 Misc. Questions
> >
> > Dear Brian,
> >
> > No-one seems to have given you the type of answer I think you were
> > looking for to your first question:
> >
> > 1. I am looking for some bibliography on the 3 letter reconstructions
> > being artifical in BH roots. If the first two radicals are the same
> > and the third is different but are connected words isn't the 3 letter
> > root concept forced?
> >
> > I guess you are referring to cases in which several BH roots with
> > similar meaning share one or two consonants. The same happens in other
> > Semitic languages. There seems to be two separate processes. For
> > example GKC 30g notes the set of roots KRR, KRH, KWR and )KR, and the
> > set DKK, DWK, DK) and DKH, which seem to be derived from the biliteral
> > roots KR and DK expanded in different ways into triliterals. However,
> > the set of roots in GKC 30h all seem to have the idea of cutting: QCC,
> > QCH, QCB, QCP, QC(, QCR; Q+B, Q+L, Q+P; KSH, KSS, NKS (Syriac); GZZ,
> > GZH, GZM, GZ(, GZL, GZR; GDD, GD(, GDH, GDP, GDR; XDD, XDL, XDQ, XDR,
> > XD$; XWS, XWC, XZH, XZZ, X+B, X++, X+P, XSL, XSS, XSP, XCB, XCH, XCC,
> > XCR; these look like an original biliteral root with (mostly) a suffix
> > (B,P,(,R,L,M,Q,$ are attested here). See GKC for some further
> > explanation, but this is of course dated. There is some discussion (at
> > a common Semitic level) in "Comparative Semitic Linguistics" by
> > Patrick R. Bennitt (Eisenbrauns 1998) pp.62-64 but this does not go
> > beyond pointing out the issue and its potential links with common
> > Afro-Asiatic and even with Indo-European. Can anyone take this
> > further?
> >
> > Peter Kirk
> >
> >
> > ---
> > You are currently subscribed to b-hebrew as: sh at teol.ku.dk
> > To unsubscribe, forward this message to
> > $subst('Email.Unsub')
> > To subscribe, send an email to join-b-hebrew at franklin.oit.unc.edu.
>
> ---
> You are currently subscribed to b-hebrew as: gamirault at ktis.net
> To unsubscribe, forward this message to
> $subst('Email.Unsub')
> To subscribe, send an email to join-b-hebrew at franklin.oit.unc.edu.
>




More information about the b-hebrew mailing list