[permaculture] Veggies Follow Sod

sam bucus samm_bucus at yahoo.com
Thu Jan 6 02:01:15 EST 2011


Henrik and Lawrence- thanks for you replies.
 
Lawrence- initially a rototiller will be used to turn under the sod and then we will go to no-till for the most part. 
 
Henrik- those photos were great. He really did some serious digging. 
 
After the sod is tilled under we will make raised beds, probably 4x50 feet each. Similarly to Henrik's friend I had thought about initially building up the raised beds by furrowing where the footpaths would be to push the dirt into the raised beds while building a trench sort of to allow water to drain/raising the beds. I would like to double dig, but have had only limitted success with my endurance doing it. A few beds no problem. But I dont know how many will get done. It may become an "a few beds every year" situation. 

Thanks!

--- On Wed, 1/5/11, permaculture-request at lists.ibiblio.org <permaculture-request at lists.ibiblio.org> wrote:


From: permaculture-request at lists.ibiblio.org <permaculture-request at lists.ibiblio.org>
Subject: permaculture Digest, Vol 96, Issue 9
To: permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
Date: Wednesday, January 5, 2011, 10:43 PM


Send permaculture mailing list submissions to
    permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
    http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
    permaculture-request at lists.ibiblio.org

You can reach the person managing the list at
    permaculture-owner at lists.ibiblio.org

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
than "Re: Contents of permaculture digest..."


Today's Topics:

   1. Re: Vegetable crops to follow sod/grass (Jason Gerhardt)
   2. Svar: Re:  Vegetable crops to follow sod/grass (Thomas Paul Jahn)
   3. Re: Svar: Re:  Vegetable crops to follow sod/grass
      (Trudie Redding)
   4. Re: Vegetable crops to follow sod/grass (Lawrence F. London, Jr.)
   5. Is Yahoo Shutting Down Del.icio.us? [Update: Del.icio.us
      Responds] - Sent using Google Toolbar (Lawrence London)
   6. Re: Is Yahoo Shutting Down Del.icio.us? [Update: Del.icio.us
      Responds] - Sent using Google Toolbar (Todd Siegel)
   7. Urban Permaculture Design in Tampa, PDC at Pine Ridge
      (Cory Brennan)
   8. Uplifting thoughts (Cory Brennan)
   9. Re: Is Yahoo Shutting Down Del.icio.us? [Update: Del.icio.us
      Responds] - Sent using Google Toolbar (Lawrence F. London, Jr.)
  10. Re: Is Yahoo Shutting Down Del.icio.us? [Update: Del.icio.us
      Responds] - Sent using Google Toolbar (Todd Siegel)
  11. Re: Veggies to follow sod (sam bucus)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 11:47:56 -0700
From: Jason Gerhardt <jasongerhardt at gmail.com>
To: permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
Subject: Re: [permaculture] Vegetable crops to follow sod/grass
Message-ID:
    <AANLkTi=bhYQyqSXPoOb2t+LbE1bksg6OF464-KwSVcp4 at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Sam,
Wire worms can be a fairly common problem for potatoes following sod or
grass.  I discovered this when I was diagnosing the numerous needle-like
holes running through all my spuds the first year I sheet mulched a meadow
area a few years back.  They only inffected 30% or so of the tubers, which
was acceptable for home use, but would be troublesome for market production.
Slugs can also be a common problem of potatoes in sheet mulch.  The
solution is simple however, plant them 2-4 inches into the native soil under
the sheet mulch and they will be protected.  Soggy ground is a whole other
beast for root crops as David accurately described.
Jason


------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2011 23:07:25 +0100
From: "Thomas Paul Jahn" <tpj at life.ku.dk>
To: <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org>
Subject: [permaculture] Svar: Re:  Vegetable crops to follow sod/grass
Message-ID: <4D24F9AD020000660002DAA3 at gwia2.kvl.dk>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Poor draining could becontrolled by digging a number of trenches. A friend of mine has hisgarden in an area with high water table. His neighbors' lawn is forseasons pretty much in water. Not in his garden. he can grow rootvegetables without problem. For him, water control was the key tosoil fertility. (Another one was import of wood chips. The latter heconsiders less relevant.)In fact, he would suggestnot to till but to dig some trenches. The excavation can be used torase the beds to some extend. For him it proofed good to have anabout 50 cm (2 feet) profile that would never experience logging.Then mycelium and earthworms will become active and serve soilfertility.
Finally you would have amuch greater choice in crops.


You can see some picturesfrom various stages of his work here:
http://permakulturforum.ning.com/photo/albums/henriks-have


cheers
Thomas




>>> David Muhl  05-01-11 19:17 >>>
Hi Sam,

Dieter offered some good suggestions for cover crops...ones that will give you a little nitrogen boost in your soil.  I couldn't tell if you were inquiring about cover crops or annual, raised bed crops(?).  I grew all of the crops you listed this past summer, although the beds we used weren't raised per say, just slightly mounded.  Although we added various nutritive amendments, the biggest factor (that I observed) which affected yield was soil structure/porosity/drainage issues.  We have quite a bit of clay in our fields and not a significant amount of humus/organic matter build-up, as we were only in our second season of production.

In poorly draining areas, we sometimes only got a few smallish potatoes, whereas other ares we would get 6 to 10 (medium to large ones) per plant.  With carrots, poor drainage caused about 60% to rot right in the ground, but our better draining beds had almost no loss.  The beets were pretty tough, but germination was slower in the mucky areas, and certain weeds just out-competed them in the more distant areas of the farm that received less attention.

Not sure if that info is of use to you, but just in case...

David Muhl
Colorado

--- On Wed, 1/5/11, sam bucus  wrote:

> From: sam bucus 
> Subject: [permaculture] Vegetable crops to follow sod/grass
> To: permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> Date: Wednesday, January 5, 2011, 2:47 AM
> Hi, 
> This spring i will be developing a property in Maine, zone
> 5, within a mile fo the coast, foggy, cool summer temps.
>  
> We will be starting from an overgrown field with weedy
> sod/grass/perennial "weeds". 
>  
> Our primary objective will be using cover crops to bring
> the weeds under control before implementing a permaculture
> plan with mostly tree/shrub crops. 
>  
> However, we will be doing a rather tradtional veggie plot
> using some regular old raised beds. Can anyone offer any
> advice on what crops would do best following sod? We are
> looking largely to do as many storage crops as we can
> (potatoes, winter squash, carrots, beets, etc.) but I have
> also read about a lot of problems from pests in addition to
> the unimproved soil. 
>  
> The soil is silty loam at 0-7 inches moving to silty clay
> at 65 inches. Its main restrictive feature is that it holds
> water quite late into the spring. According to a Kinsey Ag
> soil report
> the pH is 5.8, humus content 4.1%, and called for additions
> of protein meal, sulfur, rock phosphate, dolomite, potash
> sulfate, borax, manganese, copper and zinc sulfate.
>  
> Over the long run we have a good soil improvement program
> going. But does anyone have 
> any suggestions for putting in right after sod? 
>  
> Thanks, 
> Sam
> 
> 
>       
> _______________________________________________
> permaculture mailing list
> permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> Subscribe, unsubscribe, change your user configuration
> here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
> Read the public message archives here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture
> Command to put in your browser's Google search box to
> search these archives:
> site:lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [search
> string (omit the brackets)]
> List Usage & Guidelines:
> http://ibiblio.org/permaculture/documents/permaculturelistguide.faq
> Permaculture http://www.ibiblio.org/permaculture
> Permaculture Mailing List Blog
> http://permaculturelist.blogspot.com
> permaculture forums http://www.permies.com/permaculture-forums
> List contact: permacultureforum at gmail.com
> 


      
_______________________________________________
permaculture mailing list
permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
Subscribe, unsubscribe, change your user configuration here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
Read the public message archives here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture
Command to put in your browser's Google search box to search these archives:
site:lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [search string (omit the brackets)]
List Usage & Guidelines:
http://ibiblio.org/permaculture/documents/permaculturelistguide.faq
Permaculture http://www.ibiblio.org/permaculture
Permaculture Mailing List Blog
http://permaculturelist.blogspot.com
permaculture forums http://www.permies.com/permaculture-forums
List contact: permacultureforum at gmail.com




------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 16:47:14 -0600
From: "Trudie Redding" <trrredding at gmail.com>
To: "'permaculture'" <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org>
Subject: Re: [permaculture] Svar: Re:  Vegetable crops to follow
    sod/grass
Message-ID: <006e01cbad2a$806363a0$812a2ae0$@com>
Content-Type: text/plain;    charset="US-ASCII"

Great photos, thanks it helped explain the idea

--
Trudie's gmail
trrredding at gmail.com
Please use this email address for any personal messages

-----Original Message-----
From: permaculture-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org
[mailto:permaculture-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org] On Behalf Of Thomas Paul
Jahn
Sent: Wednesday, January 05, 2011 4:07 PM
To: permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
Subject: [permaculture] Svar: Re: Vegetable crops to follow sod/grass

Poor draining could becontrolled by digging a number of trenches. A friend
of mine has hisgarden in an area with high water table. His neighbors' lawn
is forseasons pretty much in water. Not in his garden. he can grow
rootvegetables without problem. For him, water control was the key tosoil
fertility. (Another one was import of wood chips. The latter heconsiders
less relevant.)In fact, he would suggestnot to till but to dig some
trenches. The excavation can be used torase the beds to some extend. For him
it proofed good to have anabout 50 cm (2 feet) profile that would never
experience logging.Then mycelium and earthworms will become active and serve
soilfertility.
Finally you would have amuch greater choice in crops.


You can see some picturesfrom various stages of his work here:
http://permakulturforum.ning.com/photo/albums/henriks-have


cheers
Thomas




>>> David Muhl  05-01-11 19:17 >>>
Hi Sam,

Dieter offered some good suggestions for cover crops...ones that will give
you a little nitrogen boost in your soil.  I couldn't tell if you were
inquiring about cover crops or annual, raised bed crops(?).  I grew all of
the crops you listed this past summer, although the beds we used weren't
raised per say, just slightly mounded.  Although we added various nutritive
amendments, the biggest factor (that I observed) which affected yield was
soil structure/porosity/drainage issues.  We have quite a bit of clay in our
fields and not a significant amount of humus/organic matter build-up, as we
were only in our second season of production.

In poorly draining areas, we sometimes only got a few smallish potatoes,
whereas other ares we would get 6 to 10 (medium to large ones) per plant.
With carrots, poor drainage caused about 60% to rot right in the ground, but
our better draining beds had almost no loss.  The beets were pretty tough,
but germination was slower in the mucky areas, and certain weeds just
out-competed them in the more distant areas of the farm that received less
attention.

Not sure if that info is of use to you, but just in case...

David Muhl
Colorado

--- On Wed, 1/5/11, sam bucus  wrote:

> From: sam bucus 
> Subject: [permaculture] Vegetable crops to follow sod/grass
> To: permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> Date: Wednesday, January 5, 2011, 2:47 AM
> Hi, 
> This spring i will be developing a property in Maine, zone
> 5, within a mile fo the coast, foggy, cool summer temps.
>  
> We will be starting from an overgrown field with weedy
> sod/grass/perennial "weeds". 
>  
> Our primary objective will be using cover crops to bring
> the weeds under control before implementing a permaculture
> plan with mostly tree/shrub crops. 
>  
> However, we will be doing a rather tradtional veggie plot
> using some regular old raised beds. Can anyone offer any
> advice on what crops would do best following sod? We are
> looking largely to do as many storage crops as we can
> (potatoes, winter squash, carrots, beets, etc.) but I have
> also read about a lot of problems from pests in addition to
> the unimproved soil. 
>  
> The soil is silty loam at 0-7 inches moving to silty clay
> at 65 inches. Its main restrictive feature is that it holds
> water quite late into the spring. According to a Kinsey Ag
> soil report
> the pH is 5.8, humus content 4.1%, and called for additions
> of protein meal, sulfur, rock phosphate, dolomite, potash
> sulfate, borax, manganese, copper and zinc sulfate.
>  
> Over the long run we have a good soil improvement program
> going. But does anyone have 
> any suggestions for putting in right after sod? 
>  
> Thanks, 
> Sam
> 
> 
>       
> _______________________________________________
> permaculture mailing list
> permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> Subscribe, unsubscribe, change your user configuration
> here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
> Read the public message archives here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture
> Command to put in your browser's Google search box to
> search these archives:
> site:lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [search
> string (omit the brackets)]
> List Usage & Guidelines:
> http://ibiblio.org/permaculture/documents/permaculturelistguide.faq
> Permaculture http://www.ibiblio.org/permaculture
> Permaculture Mailing List Blog
> http://permaculturelist.blogspot.com
> permaculture forums http://www.permies.com/permaculture-forums
> List contact: permacultureforum at gmail.com
> 


      
_______________________________________________
permaculture mailing list
permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
Subscribe, unsubscribe, change your user configuration here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
Read the public message archives here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture
Command to put in your browser's Google search box to search these archives:
site:lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [search string (omit the
brackets)]
List Usage & Guidelines:
http://ibiblio.org/permaculture/documents/permaculturelistguide.faq
Permaculture http://www.ibiblio.org/permaculture
Permaculture Mailing List Blog
http://permaculturelist.blogspot.com
permaculture forums http://www.permies.com/permaculture-forums
List contact: permacultureforum at gmail.com


_______________________________________________
permaculture mailing list
permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
Subscribe, unsubscribe, change your user configuration here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
Read the public message archives here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture
Command to put in your browser's Google search box to search these archives:
site:lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [search string (omit the
brackets)]
List Usage & Guidelines:
http://ibiblio.org/permaculture/documents/permaculturelistguide.faq
Permaculture http://www.ibiblio.org/permaculture
Permaculture Mailing List Blog
http://permaculturelist.blogspot.com
permaculture forums http://www.permies.com/permaculture-forums
List contact: permacultureforum at gmail.com



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2011 18:54:19 -0500
From: "Lawrence F. London, Jr." <venaurafarm at bellsouth.net>
To: permaculture <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org>
Subject: Re: [permaculture] Vegetable crops to follow sod/grass
Message-ID: <4D2504AB.4070505 at bellsouth.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

On 1/5/2011 5:47 AM, sam bucus wrote:
> Hi, This spring i will be developing a property in Maine, zone 5,
> within a mile fo the coast, foggy, cool summer temps.
>
> We will be starting from an overgrown field with weedy
> sod/grass/perennial "weeds".
>
> Our primary objective will be using cover crops to bring the weeds
> under control before implementing a permaculture plan with mostly
> tree/shrub crops.

This is a good plan and is manageable, the weeds, that is.
Are you doing this by hand or with a) rototiller b) tractor drawn 
implements?

> However, we will be doing a rather tradtional veggie plot using some
> regular old raised beds. Can anyone offer any advice on what crops
> would do best following sod? We are looking largely to do as many
> storage crops as we can (potatoes, winter squash, carrots, beets,
> etc.)

Read this document, especially the beginning half:

Gardening Hand Tool Sourcelist
http://www.ibiblio.org/ecolandtech/documents/gardening-hand-tools.faq

===================================================================
Biointensive Gardening Guide and Farm & Garden Hand Tool Sourcelist
===================================================================

Permanent No-Till Biointensive Double-Dug Raised Bed Garden Preparation 
and Handtool Information & Sourcelist

Amend your soil as you disturb it, i.e. invert or till under the sod.

Then you should be able to do well with just about any crop suitable for 
your climatic zone given adequate light and water.

> but I have also read about a lot of problems from pests in
> addition to the unimproved soil.

I would not worry about that.

> The soil is silty loam at 0-7 inches moving to silty clay at 65
> inches. Its main restrictive feature is that it holds water quite
> late into the spring. According to a Kinsey Ag soil report the pH is
> 5.8, humus content 4.1%, and called for additions of protein meal,
> sulfur, rock phosphate, dolomite, potash sulfate, borax, manganese,
> copper and zinc sulfate.

Do not add specific minerals or trace elements. Ex. if your soil is 
deficient in sulphur then add some to it otherwise it will lower soil 
pH. Other than that adding a combination of high calcium lime, dolomitic 
lime and aragonite in carefully measured amounts will raise soil pH, 
hopefully to the optimum level of about 6.3-6.8. Beneficial soil 
microorganisms will help adjust soil pH to plant-optimal levels.

> Over the long run we have a good soil improvement program going. But
> does anyone have any suggestions for putting in right after sod?

You would probably benefit from amending your soil with the following 
commonly used materials:

azomite  trace minerals
greensand  k + trace minerals
rock or colloidal phosphate  p
manure n.p.k
compost  n,p,k
granulated or liquid seaweed

alfalfa meal
feather meal
crab waste
seaweed
blood meal
fish meal
fish emulsion

1) any kind of IM, EM, ACT, various other compost teas, fermented plant 
extracts and similar soil amendments
2) any particular types of compost made up of varying ingredients
3) commercially available organic soil amendments:
all sorts of quarry rock dusts: pyrophyllite, granite, basalt, feldspar, 
other (volcanic tuff)
oyster shell
pulverized seashell meal
hi cal lime
aragonite
azomite
fish meal
crab waste
seaweed, dry or liquid
blood meal
manures of all sorts
guano
greensand
rock or colloidal phosphate
dolomitic lime
soybean meal
alfalfa meal
others
4) irrigation and drainage strategies
5) cropping methods:
wide beds
raised beds
row
Fukuoka
grid
random pattern broadcast seeding of tilled soil for field crops (Middle 
Ages method perhaps)

> Thanks, Sam


------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 21:40:27 -0500
From: Lawrence London <lfljvenaura at gmail.com>
To: permaculture <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org>
Subject: [permaculture] Is Yahoo Shutting Down Del.icio.us? [Update:
    Del.icio.us Responds] - Sent using Google Toolbar
Message-ID:
    <AANLkTimZ24k0DfuufzU_XqQxHB0Xq+C_Z8v4NGKw+bO2 at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

http://techcrunch.com/2010/12/16/is-yahoo-shutting-down-del-icio-us/

"Delicious in quite a few aspects is better search engine than Google. It is
driven by humans vs. ranking algorithms.
I routinely [used to] refer to delicious to find great sites and stuff that
people like, where Google would show them on 10-th page due to SEO spam.

I hope someone with brains will manage to take over delicious and keep it
growing."

"That wholesale dumping of Geocities was insane. What corporate waste. I
guess they figured the write down in the short term was better than the long
term revenue. Still, they had millions and millions of indexed pages. That
could have fed and clothed a hundred employees for years just from even the
tiniest residuals. Slovenly."

Diigo for me - the hell with reddit (won't archive my bookmarks)
Will look again at Stumbleupon again..

LL


------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 20:05:56 -0700
From: Todd Siegel <todd.siegel at gmail.com>
To: permaculture <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org>
Subject: Re: [permaculture] Is Yahoo Shutting Down Del.icio.us?
    [Update: Del.icio.us Responds] - Sent using Google Toolbar
Message-ID:
    <AANLkTim00bLD-8Q1pSuhKpNHwEHcKByc5SjthHoLbTor at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Yahoo insists they are selling Delicious, yet they have fired much of the
development staff. People familiar with the internals of Delicious say its
infrastructure too tightly coupled to Yahoo's to be cleanly separated
if sold off.

If you use Delicious to bookmark sites its better to play it safe and export
your bookmarks: https://secure.delicious.com/settings/bookmarks/export

Todd

On Wed, Jan 5, 2011 at 7:40 PM, Lawrence London <lfljvenaura at gmail.com>wrote:

> http://techcrunch.com/2010/12/16/is-yahoo-shutting-down-del-icio-us/
>
> "Delicious in quite a few aspects is better search engine than Google. It
> is
> driven by humans vs. ranking algorithms.
> I routinely [used to] refer to delicious to find great sites and stuff that
> people like, where Google would show them on 10-th page due to SEO spam.
>
> I hope someone with brains will manage to take over delicious and keep it
> growing."
>
> "That wholesale dumping of Geocities was insane. What corporate waste. I
> guess they figured the write down in the short term was better than the
> long
> term revenue. Still, they had millions and millions of indexed pages. That
> could have fed and clothed a hundred employees for years just from even the
> tiniest residuals. Slovenly."
>
> Diigo for me - the hell with reddit (won't archive my bookmarks)
> Will look again at Stumbleupon again..
>
> LL
> _______________________________________________
> permaculture mailing list
> permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> Subscribe, unsubscribe, change your user configuration here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
> Read the public message archives here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture
> Command to put in your browser's Google search box to search these
> archives:
> site:lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [search string (omit the
> brackets)]
> List Usage & Guidelines:
> http://ibiblio.org/permaculture/documents/permaculturelistguide.faq
> Permaculture http://www.ibiblio.org/permaculture
> Permaculture Mailing List Blog
> http://permaculturelist.blogspot.com
> permaculture forums http://www.permies.com/permaculture-forums
> List contact: permacultureforum at gmail.com
>


------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2011 10:16:31 -0800 (PST)
From: Cory Brennan <cory8570 at yahoo.com>
To: cory at permacultureguild.us
Subject: [permaculture] Urban Permaculture Design in Tampa, PDC at
    Pine Ridge
Message-ID: <649867.62035.qm at web121606.mail.ne1.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1

Just wanted to let folks know that we'll be holding another urban Permaculture Design Course in Tampa before I go to Pine Ridge in April, and a Pine Ridge course, headed by Warren Brush, in late June. ?Please forward to anyone you know who might be interested!
The Urban course will run six weekends from Feb 5 thru April 3, with some weekends off. We focus heavily on urban design solutions with an emphasis on small scale food forestry and gardening, including running a CSA out of your yard; economics; community organizing and creating community in a city environment; and retrofitting existing structure for sustainability. These urban courses help us fund our work at Pine Ridge and in Haiti, so please let people know about the course! ?We deliver a high quality course and provide many extras to students such as career counseling, course pack, a great resource database, etc.?
The Pine Ridge course will be held at our demonstration site at Pine Ridge reservation from June 13-26. ?This will run in conjunction with our intern and apprenticeship program - students can come early or stay after the course for an immersive experience in a pretty intense design process to transform this site and reach out to the rest of the rez. ?This course offers a unique cultural experience on Pine Ridge Lakota reservation along with the design course. Food and camping are included in the price.
Some sliding scale and work study is available for the Tampa course - Pine Ridge course discounts and scholarships are reserved for Lakota at Pine Ridge.?
More info is at the web site permacultureguild.us or write to me. ?
Cory Brennanpermacultureguild.us



      

------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 04:45:42 -0800 (PST)
From: Cory Brennan <cory8570 at yahoo.com>
To: cory at permacultureguild.us
Subject: [permaculture] Uplifting thoughts
Message-ID: <432849.71049.qm at web121604.mail.ne1.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

www.pyeglobal.org/blog/http://www.pyeglobal.org/Here We Go!WRITTEN BY: CHARLIE?-?DEC? 16?10We are seeing the tiniest tip of the ice burg in terms of what we can learn from each other. One of our goals as an organization is to shine a light on a more creative, depth-oriented way of coming together, particularly as it relates to activating the full potential of young people.?We consider this work a form of social artistry and we seek to elevate the role of the social artist around the world.?I have been intrigued by the idea of the social artist for a long time because I think it accurately describes who we are.In the early 1900?s social philosopher and educator Rudolf Steiner predicted that a new, higher form of art would emerge at the?end of the?20th?century?an art form in which people use their creativity to learn how to live well in community. He called this ?social art?. Educator?Jean Houston?predicted the emergence of
the??social artist,? whose medium is the human community. According to?Houston, such a person??brings the focus, perspective, skill training, tireless dedication, and fresh vision of the artist to the social arena.?Here is what I know from my work around the world: Rudolph Steiner and Jean Houston?s prediction are very much alive in the world and growing rapidly. We practice social artistry in many diverse parts of the world:? London, Bangalore,?Cape Town, rural Eastern Cape South Africa,?Kampala?and rural?Uganda, Seattle and?British Columbia.?Everywhere we go, in every community we find people who fit the description of a social artist, and we discover each other. What?s more, the same vibe exists among the people who are drawn to and fed by this way of working wherever we go in the world.?Though the life situations differ widely, I am in the fortunate position of experiencing the same generosity of spirit, the same shared
delight that social artists take in the blossoming of each person in every place we are engaged. An after-camp staff celebration has the same sweetness, wild joy, and fullness of heart in Kampala, as it does in?London?as it does in?Bangalore. And every time I am blessed to be in the midst of this kind of energy, I say to myself, ?I want these people to know the others, in different parts of the world, who also gain meaning through creating safe spaces where everyone?s creativity can be expressed.?While our world often seems to be falling apart, I am continually energized by the lived experience that we, as humans, have the capacity?both the science and the art?to form creative communities and address the challenges we face. We are discovering how much fun it is to put these capacities into practice; joy is an organizing principle we can rely on.?With each passing year, I am encountering ever increasing receptivity to the idea that a more
creative, arts-based, holistic approach is needed in education, that education ought be connected to the change that is needed in the world, and that emotional and social intelligence is a fundamental capacity that must be developed as a foundation for individual and collective advancement.?That I can walk into a school in the heart of a Muslim community in Bangalore and meet, in the person of the school?s principal, a joyful, inspiring social artist and an immediate and energetic ally in this work is only one indication that something powerful is afoot.The game of life is more fun when everyone blossoms, and we can enhance that blossoming the more we share stories from this work and the wisdom we develop along the way. Each of you is an essential voice in this growing network, a movement of human possibility. I can?t wait to hear what you have to say.

--?
??
Learn the alchemy true human beings know.
The Moment you accept what troubles you've been given, the door will open. -Rumi

"Opportunities to find deeper Powers within ourselves come when life seems most challenging." -?Joseph Campbell

"...the greatest change we need to make is from consumption to
production, even if on a small scale, in our own gardens. If only 10% of
us do this, there is enough for everyone.
Hence the futility of revolutionaries who have no gardens, who depend on
the very system they attack, and who produce words and bullets, not food
and shelter." -?Bill Mollison


      

------------------------------

Message: 9
Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2011 22:35:04 -0500
From: "Lawrence F. London, Jr." <venaurafarm at bellsouth.net>
To: permaculture <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org>
Subject: Re: [permaculture] Is Yahoo Shutting Down Del.icio.us?
    [Update: Del.icio.us Responds] - Sent using Google Toolbar
Message-ID: <4D253868.2080903 at bellsouth.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

On 1/5/2011 10:05 PM, Todd Siegel wrote:
> Yahoo insists they are selling Delicious, yet they have fired much of the
> development staff. People familiar with the internals of Delicious say its
> infrastructure too tightly coupled to Yahoo's to be cleanly separated
> if sold off.
>
> If you use Delicious to bookmark sites its better to play it safe and export
> your bookmarks: https://secure.delicious.com/settings/bookmarks/export

Thanks Todd. What's a good alternative to Delicious? It is valuable to 
consolidate nd back up all your bookmarks accessable to all your 
computers. I have found XMarks, Foxmarks to be too slow. Google's 
methods of backing up to your Google Desktop and through Chrome seems 
OK. What is a good way to back up bookmarks so that all computers have 
the same copy. I have tried exporting my Firefox bookmarks as .html then 
importing that file into Firefox on my other computers - I think this 
process does not work completely as I see big gaps after imports.


------------------------------

Message: 10
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 21:14:57 -0700
From: Todd Siegel <todd.siegel at gmail.com>
To: permaculture <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org>
Subject: Re: [permaculture] Is Yahoo Shutting Down Del.icio.us?
    [Update: Del.icio.us Responds] - Sent using Google Toolbar
Message-ID:
    <AANLkTi=UVvK=a_fhSmOMApJwpa8KeZhHWOuS3RWBV77K at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

I don't know. I have been looking for one. There is Diigo, which you
mentioned. The is also Pinboard, but they charge.

There is also Instapaper <http://www.instapaper.com/>.  It's not a
bookmarking site, per se.  It just saves things for you read later: online,
on a Kindle, an iPad, or, of course, on paper. I just started using it
recently and have already saved a bunch of pages that have come across this
list.

On Wed, Jan 5, 2011 at 8:35 PM, Lawrence F. London, Jr. <
venaurafarm at bellsouth.net> wrote:

> On 1/5/2011 10:05 PM, Todd Siegel wrote:
>
>> Yahoo insists they are selling Delicious, yet they have fired much of the
>> development staff. People familiar with the internals of Delicious say its
>> infrastructure too tightly coupled to Yahoo's to be cleanly separated
>> if sold off.
>>
>> If you use Delicious to bookmark sites its better to play it safe and
>> export
>> your bookmarks: https://secure.delicious.com/settings/bookmarks/export
>>
>
> Thanks Todd. What's a good alternative to Delicious? It is valuable to
> consolidate nd back up all your bookmarks accessable to all your computers.
> I have found XMarks, Foxmarks to be too slow. Google's methods of backing up
> to your Google Desktop and through Chrome seems OK. What is a good way to
> back up bookmarks so that all computers have the same copy. I have tried
> exporting my Firefox bookmarks as .html then importing that file into
> Firefox on my other computers - I think this process does not work
> completely as I see big gaps after imports.
>
> _______________________________________________
> permaculture mailing list
> permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> Subscribe, unsubscribe, change your user configuration here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
> Read the public message archives here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture
> Command to put in your browser's Google search box to search these
> archives:
> site:lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [search string (omit the
> brackets)]
> List Usage & Guidelines:
> http://ibiblio.org/permaculture/documents/permaculturelistguide.faq
> Permaculture http://www.ibiblio.org/permaculture
> Permaculture Mailing List Blog
> http://permaculturelist.blogspot.com
> permaculture forums http://www.permies.com/permaculture-forums
> List contact: permacultureforum at gmail.com
>


------------------------------

Message: 11
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 22:43:07 -0800 (PST)
From: sam bucus <samm_bucus at yahoo.com>
To: permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
Subject: Re: [permaculture] Veggies to follow sod
Message-ID: <813201.2711.qm at web36402.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1

Thanks Dieter and David, 
?
Dieter- I will put broad beans and lupine?into the rotation. Do you have a lot of experience with lupine? Lots of people grow it here in Maine just for the flower/pleasure and I thought it would be an excellent N cover crop for the orchard. We had planned on doing about 75% of the permanent garden space to a mix of legumes and green manures. Legumes for N, buckwheat followed by rye in the fall to choke out weeds and for winter cover, and brassicas-especially daikon, to help improve drainage. (I had thought in great permie style we should just sow burdock and let those massive roots open some holes up, daikon can't be longer than them!! anyone ever done that??)
?
David- That's very interesting. I was worried exactly about rot/lack of performance with the potatoes and carrots. Those were two main storage crops. I will definetly give the carrots a try in teh fist bit of bed I double dig- why not. But potatoes at $50 for 25 pounds of organic seed taters- thats pretty steep. I may hold off, or just ease into it with a few rows and work on tilth. 
?
Thanks!!
?
Sam.


      

------------------------------

_______________________________________________
permaculture mailing list
permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
Subscribe, unsubscribe, change your user configuration here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
Read the public message archives here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture
Command to put in your browser's Google search box to search these archives:
site:lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [search string (omit the brackets)]
List Usage & Guidelines:
http://ibiblio.org/permaculture/documents/permaculturelistguide.faq
Permaculture http://www.ibiblio.org/permaculture
Permaculture Mailing List Blog
http://permaculturelist.blogspot.com
permaculture forums http://www.permies.com/permaculture-forums
List contact: permacultureforum at gmail.com


End of permaculture Digest, Vol 96, Issue 9
*******************************************



      


More information about the permaculture mailing list