[permaculture] paleo permaculture

Justin Hahn justin.hahn at gmail.com
Tue Nov 10 01:34:12 EST 2009


Sean Maley said:  "I wonder if Bear or Moose farming could be reasonably
achieved. "

I don't know about moose, but I have only read or heard of one instance of
raising bears for food, and it's not promising. This is in Japan, among the
Ainu. The bears aren't domesticated, just tamed. A bear cub is captured and
raised among humans until it is ready for slaughter. I read about this in
"Guns, Germs, and Steel" by Jarred Diamond in his essay about the reasons
why some animals and not others are domesticated. There are a lot of
reasons, but of primary importance in the case of the bear, is its ferocity
and disinclination to breed in captivity.

As for edible insects: That is great... for some people. I've tried some in
my travels around Asia, and while I won't say they're disgusting or
anything, I just don't particularly enjoy them. But, in the vein of taboo
food sources from Asia, has anyone heard of a permaculture system
incorporating dogs for food?
Here in South Korea, dogs occupy a very interesting niche. And while I
wouldn't call the farms I've visited here permaculture, they are inherently
sustainable to a certain degree, since they follow ancient practices.

On Fri, Nov 6, 2009 at 7:09 AM, Marjory <forestgarden at gvtc.com> wrote:

> Hi Justin,
>
> I eat pretty closely to a paleo diet.  Actually I came to that route via
> the desire to live sustainably.  I started out as a raw vegan....  My
> illusions of vegetarinism died when the reality of what it takes to grow
> a vegetarian diet hit home.  Animal products are far easier to grow than
> veggies or fruits.  I also don't do grains because of the work
> involved.  I do grow some veggies and fruits because I like them and
> also have a family to feed - and they are not as 'out there' as mom.
> Sweet potatoes and turnips, beets, etc. are good calorie crops and
> comfort food.
>
> I traveled to Costa Rica and toured many sustainable farms /
> permaculture sites and was surprised that even in that bio-region, yep,
> animals are much easier to raise.
>
> Marjory
> www.backyardfoodproduction.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ustin Hahn wrote:
> > I have been thinking about how a
> > "paleo<http://www.earth360.com/diet_paleodiet_balzer.html>"
> > diet would relate to Permaculture. From what I've seen on various
> > permaculture operations and farms, a lot of the effort is put toward
> grains
> > and other non-paleo foods like potatoes, taro, etc. In my reading about
> > permaculture, the planned-for food mix invariably includes a lot
> non-paleo
> > foods as well. It seems that a paleo Permaculture set-up would have some
> > distinct differences from a neolithic (as opposed to paleolithic) setup.
> > Is there anyone on this list serv who follows a paleo diet? And if so,
> how
> > does that dietary choice affect the functioning of your food system?
> >
> > JustinHahn
> > _______________________________________________
> > permaculture mailing list
> > permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> > Subscribe or unsubscribe here:
> > http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
> > Google command to search archives:
> > site:http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture searchstring
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
> _______________________________________________
> permaculture mailing list
> permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> Subscribe or unsubscribe here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
> Google command to search archives:
> site:http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture searchstring
>
>
>



More information about the permaculture mailing list