[permaculture] FRI Feb 27 / Sustainable World Radio Interview with Woody Tasch author of INQUIRIES INTO THE NATURE OF SLOW MONEY, Investing as if Food, Farms, and Fertility Mattered

Wesley Roe and Santa Barbara Permaculture Network lakinroe at silcom.com
Wed Feb 25 08:52:35 EST 2009


.Friday,Feb. 27 ,  9-10am Sustainable World Radio on KCSB 91.9 FM PST 
and streaming live on www.kcsb.org. Also found on 
www.sustainableworldradio.com, later in the month

Join Jill Cloutier of Sustainable World Radio for an interview with 
Woody Tasch author of INQUIRIES INTO THE NATURE OF SLOW MONEY, 
Investing as if Food, Farms, and Fertility Mattered 
(www.chelseagreen.com for dates for national book tour) with Wes Roe 
	There is such a thing as money that is too fast. Money that 
is too fast is money that has become so detached from people, place, 
and the activities that it is financing, that not even the experts 
understand it fully.
	Woody Tasch proposes we bring money back down to earth. A 
long-term venture capitalist, entrepreneur, and Chairman of 
Investors' Circle.

Wes Roe is a co-founder of  Santa Barbara Permaculture Network and 
Board member for 8 years of the Permaculture Credit Union 
www.pcuonline.org

BOOK SIGNING EVENT IN SANTA BARBARA
If you are questioning the role of money in building a vibrant 
healthy Community and local economy you should attend-

The event takes place on Monday, March 9, 2009, 7pm at Victoria Hall 
Theater, 33 West Victoria St, Santa Barbara. Cost $5, no reservations 
needed.  The event is presented by the Santa Barbara Permaculture 
Network NonProfit. For more information, (805) 962-2571, 
margie at sbpermaculture.org,  www.sbpermaculture.org.

FURTHER NOTES AND ARTICLES

  " We've tried Casino Capitialism.....
  Maybe it's time to try Nurture Capitalism" 



	In his newly published book, Inquiries Into The Nature of 
Slow Money, Investing as if Food, Farms, and Fertility Mattered, 
published by Chelsea Green  www.chelseagreen.com , Woody Tasch 
examines the idea of whether the world economy is going through a 
correction in the credit markets,  triggered by the sub-prime 
mortgage crisis, or whether we are teetering on the edge of something 
much deeper.  He examines our current economy, tied to petro-dollars, 
derivatives, hedge funds, futures, arbitrage, and a byzantine 
hyper-securitized system of inter-mediation--- that no program 
trader, no speculator, no investment bank CEO ---can any longer fully 
understand or manage.

	Woody Tasch proposes we bring money back down to earth.  A 
long-term venture capitalist and entrepreneur, Tasch knows Wall 
Street and is putting that experience to work to create a different 
model of venture capital through a newly formed NGO and movement 
called Slow Money, which will invest in companies that build natural 
and social capital as well as financial capital.
                   
	The Slow Money movement has two parts--- an NGO 
(non-government organization) where a series of workshops held around 
the country bring together stakeholders to talk about how they would 
invest slow money in their region, and a Fund side, coming to market 
in 2009, to raise $50-100 million to initiate a series of regional 
Slow Money venture funds . Scrutinizing  where we are in history, 
Tasch believes we have to behave differently if we want to survive, 
by nurturing  markets that don't require unlimited growth---growth 
that goes beyond the limits of natural and social capital. Tasch 
suggests we need to move from capital markets based on consumption 
and extraction to capital markets based on restoration and 
preservation. Slow Money could be the connection back to Main street 
that Wall street needs. Slow money, according to Tasch, is Nurture 
Capital.

	 
	Woody Tasch is Chairman of Investors' Circle ( 
www.investorscircle.net) , a national non-profit network of investors 
dedicated to "Patient Capital for a Sustainable Future."  Since 1992, 
Investors' Circle has facilitated the flow of over $130 million to 
over 200 sustainability-minded early-stage companies and venture 
funds, including over $25 million to 42 food companies. He is 
Chairman and President of the newly formed NGO, Slow Money, an 
intermediary dedicated to catalyzing the flow of capital to 
enterprises that support soil fertility and local food communities. 
Woody has worked as an entrepreneur, venture capitalist, board member 
and consultant with many organizations including CERES (the Coalition 
for Environmentally Responsible Economies), National Mentor, 
Greenway, Northwest Area Foundation, CIMMYT (the International Maize 
and Wheat Improvement Center) and The Farmers Diner. He is a frequent 
speaker at various socially responsible business and sustainable 
agriculture venues
                 
                   I
ChelseaGreenTV Woody Tasch
  www.chelseagreen.com/tv/episode/1541700/
Woody Tasch, author of Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money, 
discusses a new approach to Money.  Woody Tasch is the chairman and 
CEO of Investors' Cirlce--a network of over 200 angel investors, 
professional venture capitalists, foundations, family offices and 
others who are using private capital to promote the transition to a 
sustainable economy.


Why We Need Slow Money 
http://www.chelseagreen.com/bookstore/item/inquiries_into_the_nature_of_slow_money:hardcover
  There is such a thing as money that is too fast. Money that is too 
fast is money that has become so detached from people, place, and the 
activities that it is financing that not even the experts understand 
it fully. Money that is too fast makes it impossible to say whether 
the world economy is going through a correction in the credit 
markets, triggered by the subprime mortgage crisis, or whether we are 
teetering on the edge of something much deeper and more challenging, 
tied to petrodollars, derivatives, hedge funds, futures, arbitrage, 
and a byzantine hyper-securitized system of intermediation that no 
quant, no program trader, no speculator, no investment bank CEO, can 
any longer fully understand or manage. Just as no one can say 
precisely where the meat in a hamburger comes from (it may contain 
meat from as many as a hundred animals), no one can say where the 
money in this or that security has come from, where it is going, what 
is behind it, whether-if it were to be "stopped" and, like a hot 
potato, held by someone for more than a few instants-it represents 
any intrinsic or real value. Money that is too fast creates an 
environment in which, when questioned by the press about the outcome 
of the credit crisis, former treasury secretary Robert Rubin can only 
respond, "No one knows."

This kind of befuddlement is what arises when the relationships among 
capital, community, and bioregion are broken. As long as money 
accelerates around the planet, divorced from where we live, our 
befuddlement will continue. As long as the way we invest is divorced 
from how we live and how we consume, our befuddlement will worsen. As 
long as the way we invest uproots companies, putting them in the 
hands of a broad, shallow pool of absentee shareholders whose primary 
goal is the endless growth of their financial capital, our 
befuddlement at the depletion of our social and natural capital will 
only deepen. **** We must reexamine the story of progress, being 
honest about where we as a species seem to be going awry-if one 
defines nuclear weapons, 9/11, Twinkies, the continuing promulgation 
of a culture of rampant consumerism in the face of 6.6 billion 
people, climate change, volatility in global food prices, and 
widening wealth inequalities as "going awry." We must recognize the 
potentially disastrous consequences of doing the same thing over and 
over again-going more and more global, bigger and bigger, faster and 
faster-hoping for a different outcome. Then, and only then, we may 
find the courage to slow money down-not all of it, of course, but 
meaningful quantities of it. In a world of trillions of dollars a 
day, this means billions of dollars a day . . . wait . . . did I say 
billions of dollars a day? I did, and before The Twilight Zone theme 
song starts ringing in your ears, I add: The Good Lord, and his 
better half, Great Gaia, did not hand us today's global financial 
markets on a platter, blessed and preordained

. No, we invented them, and we have it in our power to reinvent them, 
to design what comes after them. What seems pre- posterous when 
viewed through the wrong end of the fast-money telescope seems 
wonderfully within reach when looked at through the lens of slow 
money, allowing us to set about the work of rebuilding healthy 
relationships among enterprises and communities and bioregions, and 
between investors and the enterprises in which they invest. Let us 
set about this work, then, so that whoever it is that comes onto the 
world stage after Homo economista and Homo consumerista and the 
Invisible Hand of the marketplace, may, as they exit stage left, 
come-fully and fearlessly and wearing whiffs of humus and manure like 
badges of honor-into view. Woody Tasch From the Prologue of Inquiries 
into the Nature of Slow Money (see page 28)

<<<<

Bringing the cash crunch back down to earth.
By Woody Tasch
www.hopedance.org/cms/content/view/637/86/
<<<
Q&A: Woody Tasch
The venture capitalist talks to Plentymag.com about his new book on 
"slow money," building natural and social capital along with economic 
capital, how to measure abstractions, and what's wrong with the 
market today
By Ragan Sutterfield

http://www.plentymag.com/features/2009/01/qa_venture_capitalist_woody_ta.php

We have been learning all about fast money. From the mortgage-backed 
securities with little grounding in reality to Bernard Madoff's Ponzi 
scheme, fast money has been showing its true self recently. Woody 
Tasch believes it's time to pull the reins back on fast money and 
create a market that values the environment, local communities, and 
the natural world as much as it does financial growth. His new book, 
Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money: Investing as if Food, Farms, 
and Fertility Mattered articulates this vision. A long-time venture 
capitalist and entrepreneur, Tasch knows Wall Street. He is putting 
that experience to work to create a different model of venture 
capital through a newly formed NGO called Slow Money, which will 
invest in companies that build natural and social capital as well as 
financial capital. Plenty spoke with Tasch by phone from his home in 
the mountains outside of Santa Fe, NM to talk about Slow Money, his 
new book, and his ideas for a new kind of economy.

<<

GreenMoney Journal - publishing since 1992
Fall 2008 issue
www.greenmoneyjournal.com/article.mpl?newsletterid=44&articleid=604

<<<
A book excerpt from Slow Money, by Woody Tasch
http://www.odemagazine.com/doc/58/slow-money-excerpt/all


More information about the permaculture mailing list