[permaculture] Conserving water in ponds

Dieter Brand diebrand at yahoo.com
Fri Aug 29 17:30:53 EDT 2008


Jay,
 
I’m not sure I understand your concept.  If the area behind the dam is filled with soil that’s washed down during storms, how then can you use water from behind the dam for irrigation?

 
I use stones and fallen over tree trunks to build numerous little dams across waterlines so as to trap water and soil that’s washed down during heavy rains.  This prevents soil from being washed down into the river and breaks the water flow, thus allowing more rain water to enter the soil; however, I can’t use it for irrigation.
 
To trap water for irrigation and the household, I excavated a hole in a place with humidity all through the year.  I put in a tube at the bottom to draw off water by gravity.  Then I used large stones to build dry stone walls (well they aren’t really dry, I mean walls without mortar) inside the hole.  Upstream of the stone-lined hole, I filled in the empty space with stones and gravel to allow water to flow into the walled hole and to filter it at the same time.  Downstream, I used a type of gray clay (can’t remember the English word, argile in French) that is impenetrable to water.  In this way, all the water coming down the hill is first filtered and then stored inside the stone-lined hole from where I can draw it off into a water tank.
 
Dieter Brand
Portugal

--- On Thu, 8/28/08, Jay Woods <woodsjay at cox.net> wrote:

From: Jay Woods <woodsjay at cox.net>
Subject: Re: [permaculture] Conserving water in ponds
To: "permaculture" <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org>
Date: Thursday, August 28, 2008, 9:03 AM

Jay, I’m not sure I understand your concept.  If the area behind the dam is filled with soil that’s washed down during storms, how then can you use water from behind the dam for irrigation? I use stones and fallen over tree trunks to build numerous little dams across waterlines so as to trap water and soil that’s washed down during heavy rains.  This prevents soil from being washed down into the river and breaks the water flow, thus allowing more rain water to enter the soil; however, I can’t use it for irrigation. To trap water for irrigation and the household, I excavated a hole in a place with humidity all through the year.  I put in a tube at the bottom to draw off water by gravity.  Then I used large stones to build dry stone walls (well they aren’t really dry, I mean walls without mortar) inside the hole.  Upstream of the stone-lined hole, I fill in the empty space with stones and gravel to allow water to flow into the walled hole
 and to filter it at the same time.  Downstream, I used a type of gray clay (can’t remember the English word, argile in French) that is impenetrable to water.  In this way, all the water coming down the hill is first filtered and then stored inside the stone-lined hole from where I can draw it off into a water tank.  On Wednesday 27 August 2008 03:27:17 pm Dieter Brand wrote:> I live in the South of Portugal. > Rainfall May through September:  0 inches. > This is not a drought it is the regular dry season. > A drought is when the winter rains also fail, which happens on everage > twice every 14 years. > Most people around here have artificial lakes.  A bulldozer will close a > small valley with a dam and then compact the soil.  In some places the soil > holds the water well, in other places the lake bottom leaks so much that it> runs dry before the summer is over even without using any water for > irrigation.  It's a bit of gamble.  To have
 any effect it needs to be at > least a quarter acre in size.  There is no way to prevent evaporation.  The > deeper the lake the better your chances of having water all through the > summer. The depth should not be less then 20 or 30 feet. > I don't have a lake.  I try to increase SOM (soil organic matter) so as to > improve the water retention properties of the soil. A clay soil with high > organic content has good soil structure and many pores that can multiply > the amount of water held by the soil without being water logged. In the > garden, I have been able to reduce irrigation by about 80% in the last 6 > years.  Weeds and grass are cut at the onset of the dry season so as to > reduce transpiration.  The topsoil and mulch prevent evaporation through > capillary action.  There isn't much one can do about deep percolation > though.  Other strategies include, growing as much as possible during the > wet season, and learning which crop will
 survive with little or not water, > for examples: beans, tomatoes, squash, etc. > Dieter Brand, Portugal> >  > > --- On Wed, 8/27/08, Robert Waldrop <bwaldrop at cox.net> wrote:> > From: Robert Waldrop <bwaldrop at cox.net> > Subject: Re: [permaculture] Conserving water in ponds > To: "permaculture" <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org> > Date: Wednesday, August 27, 2008, 3:08 PM> > Other ideas about mitigation strategies would be> helpful too. RMW> > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Robert Waldrop" <bwaldrop at cox.net>> To: "permaculture" > <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org> > Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2008 9:07 AM > Subject: [permaculture] Conserving water in ponds> > >A report has recently been released by the > > Oklahoma Climatological Survey predicting that> > as > > a result of climate change, droughts in Oklahoma > > will increase in frequency and severity. As a > > result, there is a discussion going on among the > > producers-members of the Oklahoma
 Food Coop over > > mitigation strategies. One issue that has come> > up > > is "conserving water in ponds", presumably by > > reducing evaporation.> > > > Any thoughts about that? Would aquatic plants > > that cover the surface of the water help?> > > > Bob Waldrop, OKC_______________________________________________ permaculture mailing listpermaculture at lists.ibiblio.org Subscribe or unsubscribe here: http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture Google command to search archives: site:http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture searchstring


      


More information about the permaculture mailing list