[permaculture] Larry Santoyo's Plant List

Lisa Rollens rollens at fidnet.com
Tue Nov 15 17:12:44 EST 2005


You all do know that autumn olives are edible, don't you?  I have eaten
about a gallon this year.  They are juicy and tart/sweet with soft edible
seeds and a nice thirst quencher when doing things outdoors.  Also a friend
has wine from autumn olives going and I tried wine, but I think I am getting
vinegar!  :^)  Russian Olive is invasive but my sheep and horses cleared
almost a whole pasture of them in Ohio.  Supposedly turkeys and other
poultry love them and I am thinking about planting some in my poultry areas.
You are scaring me with all this "invasive" talk.  I searched on the
internet and all I found was how to kill them.  I don't think that is the
Permaculture way tho.  Aren't we supposed to look at it a different way and
call it a resource???

Lisa, in the Ozarks, USA


----- Original Message -----
From: "mIEKAL aND" <dtv at mwt.net>
To: "permaculture" <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2005 12:45 PM
Subject: Re: [permaculture] Larry Santoyo's Plant List


> I would replace those two with Goumi (Eleagnus multiflora), which has
> an edible fruit good for jams, jellies, wines & wildlife & at least
> around here does not appear to be suckering.  The other plant from
> Elaeagnceae which is very good, multiple uses, & produces a fruit
> with some of the highest amount of vitamin C in the northern
> hemisphere is Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) which also is
> not suckering for me tho some folks in looser soil have claimed it does.
>
> Autumn Olive is out of control in old pastures around here & prairie
> groups spend a lot of hours grubbing them out.
>
> ~mIEKAL
>
>
>
>
> On Nov 15, 2005, at 12:33 PM, Michael Burns wrote:
>
> > Thanks also for the list. I posted it to the local "finger lakes
> > permaculture"
> > listserv and got the following replies. I don't know enough about
> > the plants
> > mentioned, or the issues surrounding invasives to comment. Maybe
> > other could?
> >
> > "I consider Russian and Autumn Olive to be invasive.
> > I believe one or both are on the invasive plants list of NYIPC.
> > They also are very strong allelopaths, which could
> > affect native plants.   I hope you'll take it off your list.
> > Thanks, Barbara"
> >
> > "Though I have much yet to learn about permaculture, I do know
> > something about
> > plants, and in particular, non-native invasive plants...several of
> > the species
> > on this list are non-native and some are considered invasive...if
> > you are
> > concerned at all about the integrity of natural, native systems,
> > please avoid
> > planting Elaeagnus angustifolia and E. umbellata, and crownvetch
> > (Coronilla
> > varia)...
> >
> > Interested in learning more about plant nativity and invasiveness?
> > A good
> > place to start is http://plants.usda.gov/.
> >
> > --Anna Stalter"
> >
> > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> > Michael Burns
> > http://www.cayuta.org
> > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> _______________________________________________
> permaculture mailing list
> permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture




More information about the permaculture mailing list