[permaculture] Permaculturing an existing dwelling

woodsjay at cox.net woodsjay at cox.net
Sat Apr 23 05:13:26 EDT 2005


Move all the plumbing/water storage/HVAC to one section of 
the house (See also item 14) and be able to seal that 
section off. Super-insulate that section first while you 
are wind proofing it. Be able to drain the lines that you 
haven't been able to move.  
 
Use wood burning stoves (See also item 15) that don't 
require dampers and that pull air for combustion directly 
from the outside. 
 
On Friday 22 April 2005 20:25, Robert Waldrop wrote: 
> New passive solar construction isn't an option now 
> for me or for many other people. 
> So we are working, slowly but surely, on the 
> permaculturing of our dwelling.  Here 
> is the list of "best practices" we have compiled, 
> some of these projects are actually in progress. 
> 
> So here are some of the "best practice" retrofit 
> ideas I have seen 
> discussed here and elsewhere. 
> 
> (1) Super-insulation, typically R-45-50 in the 
> walls and R-75 in the 
> attic (or so).  I think the best resource to use 
> for this is 
> cellulose.  It has a lower embodied energy than 
> fiberglass.  In 
> existing construction, the way to get this much 
> insulation in walls 
> is to build a new interior frame all the way 
> around the exterior 
> walls of your house.  Pack that with cellulose, 
> cover with whatever, 
> and voila, superinsulated walls.  You lose a 
> little space, 10-12 
> inches around the exterior walls, which also has 
> the benefit of 
> reducing the area to be heated or cooled. 
> 
> (2) Passive solar adaptations -- e.g. adding sun 
> spaces on south 
> walls, solar batteries, greenhouses, solar 
> chimneys, trombe walls, 
> etc. 
> 
> (3) Ceiling fans and a low powere whole house fan 
> (as a substitute 
> for conventional air conditioning).  In dry areas, 
> swamp coolers. 
> 
> (4) Grey water recovery and re-use system. 
> 
> (5) Solar clothes dryer (a/k/a The Clothesline.) 
> 
> (6) Removing high energy/wasteful appliances such 
> as dishwashers, 
> garbage disposals and compacters, and clothes 
> dryers. 
> 
> (7) Replacing incandescent lighting with compact 
> florescent lighting. 
> 
> (8) Window and door quilts. 
> 
> (9) Window shades in the summer. 
> 
> (10) Planting deciduous trees and other vegetation 
> and placing 
> associated structures (trellises, vines, large 
> shrubs, etc.) 
> appropriately so that your sunny exposures are 
> shaded in the summer, 
> but open to sunlightin the winter. 
> 
> (11) Green roofs (or very shady roofs). 
> 
> (12) Rainwater harvesting and distribution system. 
> 
> (13) Drip irrigation for gardens (fed with 
> harvested rainwater and 
> grey water). 
> 
> (14) Super-insulated room in the interior as a 
> "cold weather 
> shelter". 
> 
> (15) Wood burning stoves for cooking and heating. 
> 
> (16) Outdoor kitchen for summer use, including a 
> brick oven and a 
> solar oven. 
> 
> (17) Edible landscaping (permaculture zones 1 and 
> 2). 
> 
> (18) Solar hot water heating. 
> 
> (19) Solar air heating 
> 
> (20) Solar chargers for small batteries (like the 
> $15 Crane Co. 
> model). 
> 
> (21) Underground food storage area -- for storage 
> of 
> vegetables, home processed foods, and aging 
> saurkraut, kimchee, 
> pickles, wine, beer, vinegar. Also functions as a 
> tornado shelter 
> and bomb shelter. 
> 
> (22) Exterior shutters for windows (instead of or 
> in addition to 
> window shades. 
> 
> (23) Double or triple paned windows and/or "storm 
> windows".  If you 
> put your house in super-insulation mode, you will 
> have 10-12 inch 
> thick walls.  Install a second window on the 
> interior.  And a window 
> quilt. 
> 
> (24) Regular attention to caulking and 
> weatherstripping. 
> 
> (25) Ventilate the attic. 
> 
> Does anyone have suggestions for additions to this 
> list? 
> 
> Robert Waldrop, OKC 
> www.bettertimesinfo.org 
 




More information about the permaculture mailing list