Fw: Soaking Willow Cuttings Helps Them Protect Streambanks

Graham Burnett gburnett at unisonfree.net
Thu Sep 28 17:20:49 EDT 2000


Thought this might be of interest....

----- Original Message -----
From: Lon J. Rombough <lonrom at hevanet.com>
To: AGRISYNERGY <AGRISYNERGY at MAELSTROM.STJOHNS.EDU>; Organic Gardening Discussion List
<OGL at LSV.UKY.EDU>; Organic List < <organic-l at steamradio.com>
Sent: 27 September 2000 16:43
Subject: FW: Soaking Willow Cuttings Helps Them Protect Streambanks


> This item is one of the news releases and story leads that ARS Information
> distributes on weekdays to fax and e-mail subscribers. You can also get the
> latest ARS news on the World Wide Web at
> www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/thelatest.htm.
> * Feedback and questions to ARS News Service via e-mail: isnv at ars-grin.gov.
> * ARS Information Staff, 5601 Sunnyside Ave., Room 1-2251, Beltsville MD
> 20705-5128, (301) 504- 1617, fax (301) 504-1648.
>
> ----------
> From: "ARS News Service" <isnv at ars-grin.gov>
> To: "ARS News List" <ars-news at ars-grin.gov>
> Subject: Soaking Willow Cuttings Helps Them Protect Streambanks
> Date: Wed, Sep 27, 2000, 6:57 AM
>
>
> STORY LEAD:
> Soaking Willow Cuttings Helps Them Protect Streambanks
> ___________________________________________
>
> ARS News Service
> Agricultural Research Service, USDA
> Hank Becker, (301) 504-1624, hbecker at ars.usda.gov
> September 27, 2000
> ___________________________________________
>
> Soaking willow cuttings gives them a head start in protecting eroding stream
> banks.
>
> Channel erosion is a serious problem in many areas. For years, researchers
> have tried to stabilize streambanks with planted vegetation. This technique
> is usually cheaper, better for the environment and more aesthetically
> pleasing than artificial structures made from concrete and stone.
>
> For four years, Agricultural Research Service hydraulic engineer Doug
> Shields at the National Sedimentation Laboratory, Oxford, Miss., and
> University of Memphis wetland plant physiologist Reza Pezeshki investigated
> willow cuttings' survival or effectiveness when planted along streambanks to
> control erosion.
>
> Planting willow cuttings 3 to 8 inches in diameter and 4 to 8 feet long in
> winter when they are dormant is an attractive option for rapidly eroding
> sites. The posts hold and stabilize the bank until the young trees become
> established. Then the willows create conditions favorable for natural
> establishment of native vegetation. However, in many cases, willow posts
> planted in streambanks have died within a year.
>
> To find ways to enhance willow survival and growth, the scientists conducted
> a series of field and greenhouse studies that showed that cuttings are very
> sensitive to moisture and soil type. They're currently developing a simple
> site evaluation protocol to assist streambank restoration planners in
> deciding where to plant willow posts. Site characteristics used in the
> protocol will include typical groundwater elevations and soil type.
>
> Recent greenhouse studies have shown that survival rates can be doubled by
> soaking cuttings for 10 days before planting. Soaked cuttings outperformed
> those planted immediately after they were cut, growing higher and producing
> more biomass and greater numbers of roots.
>
> This finding will be of great interest to all who are working to create
> forested riparian buffer strips, control streambank erosion and restore the
> nation's 3.5 million miles of rivers currently considered degraded by
> erosion, sedimentation and excess nutrients.
>
> ARS is the chief research agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
>
> ___________________________________________

>
> Scientific contact: F. Douglas Shields, Jr., ARS National Sedimentation
> Laboratory, Oxford, Miss.; phone (662) 232-2919, fax (662) 232-2915,
> shields at sedlab.olemiss.edu.:
> ___________________________________________
> This item is one of the news releases and story leads that ARS Information
> distributes on weekdays to fax and e-mail subscribers. You can also get the
> latest ARS news on the World Wide Web at
> www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/thelatest.htm.
> * Feedback and questions to ARS News Service via e-mail: isnv at ars-grin.gov.
> * ARS Information Staff, 5601 Sunnyside Ave., Room 1-2251, Beltsville MD
> 20705-5128, (301) 504- 1617, fax (301) 504-1648.
>
>
>
>




More information about the permaculture mailing list