Use of bamboo on flood-prone riverbanks (fwd)

ranchos at sol.racsa.co.cr ranchos at sol.racsa.co.cr
Wed Feb 23 08:35:22 EST 2000


Hi:

I've read that in Indonesia they plant bamboo on hillsides when they cut a
road to keep from having landslides. The root system of bamboo is huge,
great soil retention capacity.

Jose

At 10:12 PM 02/22/2000 -0500, you wrote:
>
>---------- Forwarded message ----------
>Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2000 17:31:19 -0600
>From: Frederick Spielberg <fspielberg at oxfam.org.ni>
>To: simonh at sos.net
>Cc: permaculture at sunsite.unc.edu, fspiel at ibw.com.ni
>Subject: Use of bamboo on flood-prone riverbanks
>
>Dear Sirs/Madams:
>
>I happened on your link via "Bamboo People."
>
>A technical question:  I have recently toured communities in northern
>Honduras devastated by floods following Hurricane Mitch in October 1998
>and again last September.  Local governments in the fertile floodplain
>around San Pedro Sula annually spend millions of dollars they can scarcely
>afford repairing destroyed riverbank walls. Bamboo seems to be a common
>site in the region, yet the riverbank walls are NOT planted with the
>species.  Most often the banks are left uncompacted, or when compacted,
>bare of trees.  Is bamboo a useful tool in securing the soil of a flood
>prone riverbank? And what are the down-sides of utilizing the plant in
>such an environment?
>
>Thank you in advance for any help you can throw my way.
>
>Sincerely,
>
>Fred Spielberg
>Regional Emergency Officer
>Oxfam/Great Britain in Nicaragua
>
>Please respond to:
>
>fspiel at oxfam.org.ni
>
>
>---
>You are currently subscribed to permaculture as: ranchos at sol.racsa.co.cr
>To unsubscribe send a blank email to
$subst('Email.Unsub')
>
>
Thought for the day:

Getting too much email bogs me down but at least I know
I have friends who are thinking of me.




More information about the permaculture mailing list