[nafex] hoop house

mIEKAL aND qazingulaza at gmail.com
Thu Jan 5 10:22:20 EST 2017


My hoop house is on a super windy site, we only get 60mph rarely but
20-30 mph is extremely common.  I chose a model that had extra heavy
steel and w-bracing on the individual ribs.  It has one layer of 6mil
plastic which with luck will last for 3-4 years.  I'm hoping to put
rigid plastic on the ends which will stiffen it up even more.  And
with the NRCS hoophouse program the whole hoophouse was paid for
including the labor to install.

I'm posting a photo, not sure if it will come thru.

~mIEKAL

On Thu, Jan 5, 2017 at 12:09 AM, Jay Cutts <orders at cuttsreviews.com> wrote:
> I'm curious about the construction of the hoop house. Here in NM at 7000
> feet we have winds in the spring that can get to 50 or 60 mph. That will rip
> plastic to shreds or, if the plastic holds, the wind will destroy the
> structure.
>
> How do you make a structure to withstand that?
>
> Regards,
>
> Jay
>
> Jay Cutts
> Director, Cutts Graduate Reviews
> Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Prep Book
> Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Flash Cards
> Lead Author, Barron's LSAT Prep Book
> (505)-281-0684
> 10 am to 10 pm Mt Time, 7 days
>
> On 1/4/2017 7:27 PM, mIEKAL aND wrote:
>>
>> In the first test project I planted 8 varieties into a 32x70 high
>> tunnel.  After 3 years all 8 varieties are still coming back each
>> year. The 2nd year there were no figs set, this year several handful
>> of figs set and Desert King and Green Ischia managed to ripen a few.
>> The figs were pretty much left untended, not selectively pruned so
>> each crown had 20 to 30 shoots.  By Sept some of the growth was 9
>> feet. I'm a little miffed I didn't get an LSU Celeste Improved into
>> the planting since that variety (here in WI) ripens 4-6 weeks earlier
>> than any other of the 65 varieties I have including other cultivars of
>> Celeste.  The big caveat always in back of my mind, is that if we have
>> a polar vortex like 2013-13 everything we certainly be dead.
>>
>> ~miEKAL
>> On Wed, Jan 4, 2017 at 4:20 PM, Lee Reich <leeareich at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> In my experience, figs that die to ground level set fruit much too late
>>> to ripen. I think this would be the case even in the longer season of the
>>> hoophouse. A lot depends on the size of the hoophouse and how close the figs
>>> are to the edges.
>>>
>>> Lee Reich, PhD
>>> Come visit my farmden at
>>> http://www.leereich.com/blog <http://www.leereich.com/blog>
>>> http://leereich.com <http://leereich.com/>
>>>
>>> Books by Lee Reich:
>>> A Northeast Gardener’s Year
>>> The Pruning Book
>>> Weedless Gardening
>>> Uncommon Fruits for every Garden
>>> Landscaping with Fruit
>>> Grow Fruit Naturally
>>>
>>>> On Jan 3, 2017, at 2:34 PM, mIEKAL aND <qazingulaza at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>> Interesting concept. Do you provide any heat in the hoophouse? If not,
>>>>>> how is it any different than having the figs outside? I
>>>>
>>>> No heat.  In Wisconsin the hoophouse would extend the frostless
>>>> growing season by 6 weeks in each end of the season...  Concentrates
>>>> and collects the heat.  Reduce wind damage to zero. Protection from
>>>> bird predation. Makes it much easier to keep the roots of the figs
>>>> from freezing.  Figs also do fine producing on first year wood so I'm
>>>> focusing on varieties that ripen early.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>> wouldn't have thought that figs would set fruit on new sprouts from
>>>>
>>>> the ground. I would have guessed they'd only fruit on new wood coming
>>>> off of second year wood.
>>>>
>>>> I think that's pretty much what's happening, the sprouts are coming
>>>> from the top of the stump that's left.  it also seems like sprouts are
>>>> coming from below the stump and they don't set fruit.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>> Of course figs are naturally bushy, whereas jujubes seem to be trees.
>>>>>> I don't know how they would do being cut to the ground. It does sound like
>>>>>> jujubes can survive down to -28 (probably depending on variety, as some are
>>>>>> listed at just -10.)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> this is mostly what I was wondering, maybe I can just keep a few of
>>>> them growing as dwarfs and wrap them the way some people wrap figs...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>> Traditionally people bend the fig trees to the ground and cover them,
>>>>>> rather than cut them to the ground. Could you do that in your hoophouse?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> with the number of figs that I'm putting in that would be way too much
>>>> work, but I'll probably try it for a tree or two...
>>>>
>>>> ~mIEKAL
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Tue, Jan 3, 2017 at 12:59 PM, Jay Cutts <orders at cuttsreviews.com>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> Interesting concept. Do you provide any heat in the hoophouse? If not,
>>>>> how
>>>>> is it any different than having the figs outside? I wouldn't have
>>>>> thought
>>>>> that figs would set fruit on new sprouts from the ground. I would have
>>>>> guessed they'd only fruit on new wood coming off of second year wood.
>>>>>
>>>>> Of course figs are naturally bushy, whereas jujubes seem to be trees. I
>>>>> don't know how they would do being cut to the ground. It does sound
>>>>> like
>>>>> jujubes can survive down to -28 (probably depending on variety, as some
>>>>> are
>>>>> listed at just -10.)
>>>>>
>>>>> Traditionally people bend the fig trees to the ground and cover them,
>>>>> rather
>>>>> than cut them to the ground. Could you do that in your hoophouse?
>>>>>
>>>>> Regards,
>>>>>
>>>>> Jay
>>>>>
>>>>> Jay Cutts
>>>>> Director, Cutts Graduate Reviews
>>>>> Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Prep Book
>>>>> Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Flash Cards
>>>>> Lead Author, Barron's LSAT Prep Book
>>>>> (505)-281-0684
>>>>> 10 am to 10 pm Mt Time, 7 days
>>>>>
>>>>> On 1/3/2017 8:28 AM, mIEKAL aND wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I've put up a hoophouse to grow figs in z4 Wisconsin.  The figs will
>>>>>> all be cut back to the ground each year, covered with bales of hay and
>>>>>> the varieties chosen that will ripen fruit the quickest...   I wonder
>>>>>> if this technique would work for jujubes, since you say the fruit is
>>>>>> set on new growth.  I imagine the season length in the greenhouse will
>>>>>> be something like early April - November...
>>>>>>
>>>>>> ~mIEKAL
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On Wed, Dec 28, 2016 at 7:46 PM, Jay Cutts <orders at cuttsreviews.com>
>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Here is the (very quick) reply from Dr. Shengrui Yao:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Hi Jay,
>>>>>>> Winter hardiness is one thing and the other issue is the frost free
>>>>>>> days-length of growing season. If you season is too short, most
>>>>>>> cultivars
>>>>>>> could not be fully mature.
>>>>>>> To me, the frost free days is more critical than winter low
>>>>>>> temperature
>>>>>>> in
>>>>>>> your area. But you can get 1-2 cultivars and try it.
>>>>>>> Happy Holidays!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Shengrui
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Regards,
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Jay
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Jay Cutts
>>>>>>> Director, Cutts Graduate Reviews
>>>>>>> Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Prep Book
>>>>>>> Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Flash Cards
>>>>>>> Lead Author, Barron's LSAT Prep Book
>>>>>>> (505)-281-0684
>>>>>>> 10 am to 10 pm Mt Time, 7 days
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On 12/28/2016 5:06 PM, Henry via nafex wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> How long is the growing season at 7000 feet in New Mexico?
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Any chance of learning which cultivars survived at the Sustainable
>>>>>>>> Ag
>>>>>>>> Science Center in Alcalde?
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> --Henry Fieldseth
>>>>>>>> Minneapolis, MN, Zone 4
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> --------------------------------------------
>>>>>>>> On Wed, 12/28/16, Jay Cutts <orders at cuttsreviews.com> wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    Subject: Re: [nafex] Jujube
>>>>>>>>    To: "mailing list at ibiblio - Northamerican Allied Fruit
>>>>>>>> Experimenters"
>>>>>>>> <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
>>>>>>>>    Date: Wednesday, December 28, 2016, 4:14 PM
>>>>>>>>      Thanks, Mark. I had seen
>>>>>>>>    the original research report. I thought Alcalde
>>>>>>>>    was more like 5000 but could be wrong. I think
>>>>>>>>    I remember the report
>>>>>>>>    saying that they
>>>>>>>>    weren't getting fruit at Alcalde.
>>>>>>>>      In any case you inspired me to write directly
>>>>>>>>    to Dr. Yao to see what she
>>>>>>>>    thinks.
>>>>>>>>      This is one of the things I
>>>>>>>>    appreciate about this list so much. Great
>>>>>>>>    expertise and enthusiasm among you all!!
>>>>>>>>      Regards,
>>>>>>>>      Jay
>>>>>>>>      Jay
>>>>>>>>    Cutts
>>>>>>>>    Director, Cutts Graduate Reviews
>>>>>>>>    Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Prep Book
>>>>>>>>    Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Flash Cards
>>>>>>>>    Lead Author, Barron's LSAT Prep Book
>>>>>>>>    (505)-281-0684
>>>>>>>>    10 am to 10 pm
>>>>>>>>    Mt Time, 7 days
>>>>>>>>      On
>>>>>>>>    12/28/2016 2:52 PM, mark wessel wrote:
>>>>>>>>    Jay
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> The most
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    recent Hort Science has an article “Jujube, an Alternative
>>>>>>>>    Fruit crop for the Southwestern US”. The author is from
>>>>>>>>    New Mexico State. Evidently they are trialing over 50
>>>>>>>>    cultivars at the Sustainable Ag Science Center in Alcalde.
>>>>>>>>    It is at least 5700 ft elevation. They referenced a
>>>>>>>>    hardiness to -30C or -22F.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> The authors
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    name is Shengrui Yao.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Also, Gordon
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    Tooley of Tooleys trees may have some insight into hardiness
>>>>>>>>    in NM.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Mark
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> On Dec 28, 2016, at 3:18 PM, Jay Cutts
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    <orders at cuttsreviews.com>
>>>>>>>>    wrote:
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Has
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    anyone successfully grown jujube in zone 5 or colder?
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> I'm in NM
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    at 7000 feet. There are a number of trees that I've
>>>>>>>>    tried here that ought to grow in even colder climates but
>>>>>>>>    which get their tops killed in the winter. I think it's
>>>>>>>>    a combination of temperature (record lows have been -25),
>>>>>>>>    wind, strong sun, dryness, thaw and freeze. The trees that
>>>>>>>>    have topped-killed include Illinois Everbearing mulberry,
>>>>>>>>    American persimmon, and walnuts. The American persimmons
>>>>>>>>    eventually get tough enough growth to survive, but any
>>>>>>>>    grafted plants lose the grafted portion.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> I'm
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    concerned that the tops of jujubes would not make it. Any
>>>>>>>>    experience?
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Regards,
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Jay
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Jay Cutts
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    Director, Cutts Graduate Reviews
>>>>>>>>    Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Prep Book
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Flash
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    Cards
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Lead Author, Barron's
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    LSAT Prep Book
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> (505)-281-0684
>>>>>>>>>> 10 am to 10 pm Mt Time, 7 days
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> __________________
>>>>>>>>>> nafex mailing list
>>>>>>>>>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>>>>>>>>> Northamerican Allied Fruit
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    Experimenters
>>>>>>>>    subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    __________________
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> nafex mailing
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    list
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>>>>>>>> Northamerican Allied Fruit
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    Experimenters
>>>>>>>>    subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>      __________________
>>>>>>>>    nafex
>>>>>>>>    mailing list
>>>>>>>>    nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>>>>>>>    Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
>>>>>>>>    subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>>>>>>>    http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>>>>>>> __________________
>>>>>>>> nafex mailing list
>>>>>>>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>>>>>>> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
>>>>>>>> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>>>>>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> __________________
>>>>>>> nafex mailing list
>>>>>>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>>>>>> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
>>>>>>> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>>>>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>>>>>
>>>>>> __________________
>>>>>> nafex mailing list
>>>>>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>>>>> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
>>>>>> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>>>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>>>>>
>>>>> __________________
>>>>> nafex mailing list
>>>>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>>>> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
>>>>> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>>>
>>>> __________________
>>>> nafex mailing list
>>>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>>> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
>>>> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>>
>>> __________________
>>> nafex mailing list
>>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
>>> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>
>> __________________
>> nafex mailing list
>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
>> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>
>
> __________________
> nafex mailing list
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
-------------- next part --------------
A non-text attachment was scrubbed...
Name: greenhouse-construction2.png
Type: image/png
Size: 4438909 bytes
Desc: not available
URL: <http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex/attachments/20170105/5f6b4e24/attachment-0001.png>


More information about the nafex mailing list