[nafex] Jujube

Lee Reich leeareich at gmail.com
Wed Jan 4 17:20:15 EST 2017


In my experience, figs that die to ground level set fruit much too late to ripen. I think this would be the case even in the longer season of the hoophouse. A lot depends on the size of the hoophouse and how close the figs are to the edges.

Lee Reich, PhD
Come visit my farmden at
http://www.leereich.com/blog <http://www.leereich.com/blog>
http://leereich.com <http://leereich.com/>

Books by Lee Reich:
A Northeast Gardener’s Year
The Pruning Book
Weedless Gardening
Uncommon Fruits for every Garden
Landscaping with Fruit
Grow Fruit Naturally

> On Jan 3, 2017, at 2:34 PM, mIEKAL aND <qazingulaza at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>>> Interesting concept. Do you provide any heat in the hoophouse? If not, how is it any different than having the figs outside? I
> 
> No heat.  In Wisconsin the hoophouse would extend the frostless
> growing season by 6 weeks in each end of the season...  Concentrates
> and collects the heat.  Reduce wind damage to zero. Protection from
> bird predation. Makes it much easier to keep the roots of the figs
> from freezing.  Figs also do fine producing on first year wood so I'm
> focusing on varieties that ripen early.
> 
> 
> 
>>> wouldn't have thought that figs would set fruit on new sprouts from
> the ground. I would have guessed they'd only fruit on new wood coming
> off of second year wood.
> 
> I think that's pretty much what's happening, the sprouts are coming
> from the top of the stump that's left.  it also seems like sprouts are
> coming from below the stump and they don't set fruit.
> 
> 
>>> Of course figs are naturally bushy, whereas jujubes seem to be trees. I don't know how they would do being cut to the ground. It does sound like jujubes can survive down to -28 (probably depending on variety, as some are listed at just -10.)
> 
> 
> this is mostly what I was wondering, maybe I can just keep a few of
> them growing as dwarfs and wrap them the way some people wrap figs...
> 
> 
>>> Traditionally people bend the fig trees to the ground and cover them, rather than cut them to the ground. Could you do that in your hoophouse?
> 
> 
> with the number of figs that I'm putting in that would be way too much
> work, but I'll probably try it for a tree or two...
> 
> ~mIEKAL
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Tue, Jan 3, 2017 at 12:59 PM, Jay Cutts <orders at cuttsreviews.com> wrote:
>> Interesting concept. Do you provide any heat in the hoophouse? If not, how
>> is it any different than having the figs outside? I wouldn't have thought
>> that figs would set fruit on new sprouts from the ground. I would have
>> guessed they'd only fruit on new wood coming off of second year wood.
>> 
>> Of course figs are naturally bushy, whereas jujubes seem to be trees. I
>> don't know how they would do being cut to the ground. It does sound like
>> jujubes can survive down to -28 (probably depending on variety, as some are
>> listed at just -10.)
>> 
>> Traditionally people bend the fig trees to the ground and cover them, rather
>> than cut them to the ground. Could you do that in your hoophouse?
>> 
>> Regards,
>> 
>> Jay
>> 
>> Jay Cutts
>> Director, Cutts Graduate Reviews
>> Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Prep Book
>> Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Flash Cards
>> Lead Author, Barron's LSAT Prep Book
>> (505)-281-0684
>> 10 am to 10 pm Mt Time, 7 days
>> 
>> On 1/3/2017 8:28 AM, mIEKAL aND wrote:
>>> 
>>> I've put up a hoophouse to grow figs in z4 Wisconsin.  The figs will
>>> all be cut back to the ground each year, covered with bales of hay and
>>> the varieties chosen that will ripen fruit the quickest...   I wonder
>>> if this technique would work for jujubes, since you say the fruit is
>>> set on new growth.  I imagine the season length in the greenhouse will
>>> be something like early April - November...
>>> 
>>> ~mIEKAL
>>> 
>>> On Wed, Dec 28, 2016 at 7:46 PM, Jay Cutts <orders at cuttsreviews.com>
>>> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> Here is the (very quick) reply from Dr. Shengrui Yao:
>>>> 
>>>> Hi Jay,
>>>> Winter hardiness is one thing and the other issue is the frost free
>>>> days-length of growing season. If you season is too short, most cultivars
>>>> could not be fully mature.
>>>> To me, the frost free days is more critical than winter low temperature
>>>> in
>>>> your area. But you can get 1-2 cultivars and try it.
>>>> Happy Holidays!
>>>> 
>>>> Shengrui
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> Regards,
>>>> 
>>>> Jay
>>>> 
>>>> Jay Cutts
>>>> Director, Cutts Graduate Reviews
>>>> Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Prep Book
>>>> Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Flash Cards
>>>> Lead Author, Barron's LSAT Prep Book
>>>> (505)-281-0684
>>>> 10 am to 10 pm Mt Time, 7 days
>>>> 
>>>> On 12/28/2016 5:06 PM, Henry via nafex wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>> How long is the growing season at 7000 feet in New Mexico?
>>>>> 
>>>>> Any chance of learning which cultivars survived at the Sustainable Ag
>>>>> Science Center in Alcalde?
>>>>> 
>>>>> --Henry Fieldseth
>>>>> Minneapolis, MN, Zone 4
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> --------------------------------------------
>>>>> On Wed, 12/28/16, Jay Cutts <orders at cuttsreviews.com> wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>>   Subject: Re: [nafex] Jujube
>>>>>   To: "mailing list at ibiblio - Northamerican Allied Fruit
>>>>> Experimenters"
>>>>> <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
>>>>>   Date: Wednesday, December 28, 2016, 4:14 PM
>>>>>     Thanks, Mark. I had seen
>>>>>   the original research report. I thought Alcalde
>>>>>   was more like 5000 but could be wrong. I think
>>>>>   I remember the report
>>>>>   saying that they
>>>>>   weren't getting fruit at Alcalde.
>>>>>     In any case you inspired me to write directly
>>>>>   to Dr. Yao to see what she
>>>>>   thinks.
>>>>>     This is one of the things I
>>>>>   appreciate about this list so much. Great
>>>>>   expertise and enthusiasm among you all!!
>>>>>     Regards,
>>>>>     Jay
>>>>>     Jay
>>>>>   Cutts
>>>>>   Director, Cutts Graduate Reviews
>>>>>   Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Prep Book
>>>>>   Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Flash Cards
>>>>>   Lead Author, Barron's LSAT Prep Book
>>>>>   (505)-281-0684
>>>>>   10 am to 10 pm
>>>>>   Mt Time, 7 days
>>>>>     On
>>>>>   12/28/2016 2:52 PM, mark wessel wrote:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>   Jay
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> The most
>>>>>   recent Hort Science has an article “Jujube, an Alternative
>>>>>   Fruit crop for the Southwestern US”. The author is from
>>>>>   New Mexico State. Evidently they are trialing over 50
>>>>>   cultivars at the Sustainable Ag Science Center in Alcalde.
>>>>>   It is at least 5700 ft elevation. They referenced a
>>>>>   hardiness to -30C or -22F.
>>>>>> The authors
>>>>>   name is Shengrui Yao.
>>>>>> Also, Gordon
>>>>>   Tooley of Tooleys trees may have some insight into hardiness
>>>>>   in NM.
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Mark
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> On Dec 28, 2016, at 3:18 PM, Jay Cutts
>>>>>   <orders at cuttsreviews.com>
>>>>>   wrote:
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Has
>>>>>   anyone successfully grown jujube in zone 5 or colder?
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> I'm in NM
>>>>>   at 7000 feet. There are a number of trees that I've
>>>>>   tried here that ought to grow in even colder climates but
>>>>>   which get their tops killed in the winter. I think it's
>>>>>   a combination of temperature (record lows have been -25),
>>>>>   wind, strong sun, dryness, thaw and freeze. The trees that
>>>>>   have topped-killed include Illinois Everbearing mulberry,
>>>>>   American persimmon, and walnuts. The American persimmons
>>>>>   eventually get tough enough growth to survive, but any
>>>>>   grafted plants lose the grafted portion.
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> I'm
>>>>>   concerned that the tops of jujubes would not make it. Any
>>>>>   experience?
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Regards,
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Jay
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Jay Cutts
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>   Director, Cutts Graduate Reviews
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>   Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Prep Book
>>>>>>> Lead Author, Barron's MCAT Flash
>>>>>   Cards
>>>>>>> Lead Author, Barron's
>>>>>   LSAT Prep Book
>>>>>>> (505)-281-0684
>>>>>>> 10 am to 10 pm Mt Time, 7 days
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> __________________
>>>>>>> nafex mailing list
>>>>>>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>>>>>> Northamerican Allied Fruit
>>>>>   Experimenters
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>   subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>>>>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>>>>> 
>>>>>   __________________
>>>>>> nafex mailing
>>>>>   list
>>>>>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>>>>> Northamerican Allied Fruit
>>>>>   Experimenters
>>>>>> 
>>>>>   subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>>>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>>>>> 
>>>>>     __________________
>>>>>   nafex
>>>>>   mailing list
>>>>>   nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>>>>   Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
>>>>>   subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>>>>   http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>>>> __________________
>>>>> nafex mailing list
>>>>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>>>> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
>>>>> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>>>> 
>>>> __________________
>>>> nafex mailing list
>>>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>>> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
>>>> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>> 
>>> __________________
>>> nafex mailing list
>>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
>>> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>> 
>> 
>> __________________
>> nafex mailing list
>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
>> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
> __________________
> nafex mailing list
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex



More information about the nafex mailing list