[NAFEX] Two Questions

Robert Bruns r.fred.bruns at gmail.com
Sat Oct 8 10:32:19 EDT 2011


Fruit are genetically programmed to accelerate their maturation when they
are damaged.  It's a way to ensure that the fruit ripens before it spoils,
so the seeds still get dispersed after the fruit is eaten by animals.  In my
yard, the earliest plums and apricots to ripen are those with insect damage.

Fred

On Fri, Oct 7, 2011 at 8:53 PM, Naomi Counides <naomi at oznayim.us> wrote:

> I am reminded of something my mother told me was a popular sentiment to
> write in German School Albums.  "Do not mind when people pick at you, it is
> the sweet apples that the worms eat."
> Naomi
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: nafex-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org
> [mailto:nafex-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org] On Behalf Of david liezen
> Sent: Friday, October 07, 2011 6:17 PM
> To: North American Fruit Explorers
> Subject: [NAFEX] Two Questions
>
>
> To the List:
> 1) I've noticed a distinct sweetness in apples that have had a codling
> caterpillar in them during the season, above that of apples on the same
> tree
> unmolested. What is that about?
> 2) I know someone who would like to graft about 30 each Mutsu/Crispin and
> Zestar next spring. What is the best way to obtain such scion wood? Is it
> even possible, since it appears Zestar may yet be a patented cultivar?
> Many thanks,
> Dave Liezen
> __________________
> nafex mailing list
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> Subscribe, unsubscribe, change your user configuration or find out more
> about the list here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
> NAFEX web site: http://www.nafex.org/
>
> __________________
> nafex mailing list
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> Subscribe, unsubscribe, change your user configuration or find out more
> about the list here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
> NAFEX web site: http://www.nafex.org/
>


More information about the nafex mailing list