[NAFEX] Got Milk OFF TOPIC

Michael Dossett phainopepla at yahoo.com
Tue Mar 10 15:35:08 EDT 2009


Kevin,
 
rBGH (recombinant bovine growth hormone) is the same as BST (Bovine somatotropin) that Mark mentions.  Two different names for the same substance.  As for what constitutes "organic" milk, the regs are such that basically the only difference between most organic dairies and conventional ones (in this country at least) is that organic cows don't recieve antibiotics or BST and must be raised on organically grown feed.  The vast majority of organic milk in this country is not raised on pasture or any other such manner which most would consider to be more sustainable.

In Europe and elsewhere studies have shown that milk from cows raised on pasture contains more beneficial nutraceuticals (sorry I can't remember which ones off the top of my head) than those raised on silage or concentrate.  Better quality feed = better quality milk.  Unfortunately the holsteins used in commercial milk production in this country cannot survive on a pasture diet, and the other breeds don't produce nearly as much milk, which is why they are rarely used.  Quite the conundrum.

In any event this is all off topic from the list and should probably be taken to personal emails for further discussion...

Michael
 
Michael Dossett Corvallis, Oregon www.Mdossettphoto.com phainopepla at yahoo.com


--- On Tue, 3/10/09, Kevin Moore <aleguy33 at yahoo.com> wrote:


From: Kevin Moore <aleguy33 at yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [NAFEX] Got Milk OFF TOPIC
To: "North American Fruit Explorers" <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
Date: Tuesday, March 10, 2009, 12:22 PM






The hormone I'm told that is used on milk cows is RGBH. I also know that many substances, especially pesticides, are actually more dangerous at low levels than high ones. This is presumed to be because the body doesn't recognize the chemical as foreign at low enough levels, while at higher levels the immune system will act to fight it. I don't know. The actual mechanism is still under investigation.
P.S. I don't think much of any organic farmer who isn't capable of controlling pests such as flies, without chemical pesticides. I suspect they are running some sort of feedlot operation that is unsuitable for the organic production of livestock. A flock of chickens coming along behind pastured cows should be more than enough to keep the flies under control.





From: Mark Angermayer <hangermayer at isp.com>
To: North American Fruit Explorers <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 3:03:54 PM
Subject: Re: [NAFEX] Got Milk OFF TOPIC

Yes, it's more precise to say they don't dump milk just because antibiotics
can be detected.  The whole issue of detecting possible toxins may be best
summed up by a conversation I had with a researcher at Bayer Crop Science.
He told me some problems of some outdated regulations.  Apparently many
regs. for pesticides were written with phrases like "no residue".  When the
regs. were originally written the best detection equipment was in ppm.  Now
with advances in science, they can now detect parts per billion, which,
according to the researcher, leads to a lot of pointless and uneccesary
expense in licensing pesticides.  At some point the miniscule residue level
is essentially zero, even though it may be detectable.

I don't know what the allowable levels for various antibiotics are in milk.
I do know they dump milk though.  My wife, more precisely, works as an
accountant for a dairy regulatory agency.  The accounting for the dumped
milk loads comes across her desk.  In terms of hormones in milk, BST (the
only hormone used for dairy cows) is naturally produced in the cow anyway.
Cows supplemented with extra BST do not pass extra BST through their milk.
The FDA maintains there is no health risk of milk from BST cows.

In saying that, most non-organic milk is produced from non-BST cows, so it's
becoming a mute point anyway.  For many years, the dairy industry has
voluntarily moved away from using BST because of public opinion.  Some
states will not allow the marketing of BST milk.  The move away from BST is
not from concerns about health issues of BST treated cows, but because of
negative consumer opinions.  Perception is reality.

As an interesting aside, some people in my wife's office will not drink
organic milk.  They've been on too many organic farms where the fly problems
were horrendous.  Indeed organic bulk milk tests many times higher in
bacteria count than non-organic milk.  True, pasturization kills nearly all
the bacteria anyway, but they still won't drink organic.  Again perception
is reality.

Mark
KS

----- Original Message ----- 
From: Kevin Moore
To: North American Fruit Explorers
Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 11:38 AM
Subject: Re: [NAFEX] Jam too sweet?


Food processors do a lot of things that would make most people avoid their
products if they knew about them. The USDA has been steadily diluting the
requirements for the National Organic Program to allow them to do the same
things and still call the food "organic." As far as milk goes, any milk from
a "standard" dairy will have not only antibiotic residues, but hormone
residues as well. They will not dump a load of milk for antibiotic residues,
because all non-organic milk contains them. Most likely, if they dump milk
it is because it has higher than ALLOWABLE LEVELS in it. In any case I find
the hormones to be more disturbing than the antibiotics.





From: Mark Angermayer <>
To: North American Fruit Explorers <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: Monday, March 9, 2009 9:29:30 PM
Subject: Re: [NAFEX] Jam too sweet?

Michael,

That's astounding.  Why would jam companies go to the trouble of bleaching
the berries first, then recoloring them?  If they want darker jam, why don't
they just add food coloring?

It sounds strangely like urban legends I've heard in the ag industry.  Like
the one, milk is full of antibiotics  (My wife (who works in the dairy
industry) tells me they test each load before it's unloaded.  If they find
antibiotics, the whole semi-load is dumped.)  Bleaching strawberries and
recoloring them is so weird, if I hadn't heard of it from you, I'd never
believed it.

Mark
KS

_______________________________________________
nafex mailing list 
nafex at lists.ibiblio.org

Reproduction of list messages or archives is not allowed.
This includes distribution on other email lists or reproduction on web sites.
Permission to reproduce is NEVER granted, so don't claim you have permission!

**YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
Posts from email addresses that are not subscribed are discarded.
No exceptions.  
----
To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be used to change other email options):
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex

File attachments are NOT stripped by this list.
TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
Please do not send binary files.
Use plain text ONLY in emails!

NAFEX web site:  http://www.nafex.org/


-----Inline Attachment Follows-----


_______________________________________________
nafex mailing list 
nafex at lists.ibiblio.org

Reproduction of list messages or archives is not allowed.
This includes distribution on other email lists or reproduction on web sites.
Permission to reproduce is NEVER granted, so don't claim you have permission!

**YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
Posts from email addresses that are not subscribed are discarded.
No exceptions.  
----
To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be used to change other email options):
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex

File attachments are NOT stripped by this list.
TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
Please do not send binary files.
Use plain text ONLY in emails!

NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/


      



More information about the nafex mailing list