[NAFEX] Killing Poison Ivy Organically/elevation

Regina Kreger regina at kreger.net
Mon May 2 09:13:10 EDT 2005


I second that.  Bravo!

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Heron Breen" <breen at fedcoseeds.com>
To: <griffingardens at earthlink.net>; "North American Fruit Explorers"
<nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: Monday, May 02, 2005 8:57 AM
Subject: Re: [NAFEX] Killing Poison Ivy Organically/elevation


Thanks Dave for this input. Go get 'em! I just saw a great production of Man
of
LaMancha this weekend, by the way...
Keep up the good, inspiring work,
Heron, from Maine

On Mon May  2  7:35 , 'Dave Griffin' <griffingardens at earthlink.net> sent:

>  Grazing is the cause of widespread poison ivy, autumn olive, buckthorn,
>honeysuckle...not the solution. The disturbance from cattle - including
>soil compaction, elimination of native vegetation competition, exposure of
>mineral soil for seed germination - provides ideal conditions for these
>invasives to increase and thrive. Its much easier to preserve healthy woods
>than to restore them but restoration can be done with work and time. First
>eliminate the seed trees. Then regular selective weeding over time
>gradually reduces the invasives and increases the natives.
>  Buckthorn pulls easily in the spring right after the frost goes out of
>the ground and, with the seed trees gone,  there is less of it every year.
>After 12 years or so its a 2 afternoon job now for 25 acres of woods. The
>Europeans are easy to spot then and its a nice, bugless time to be in the
>woods anyway. I haven't had much luck with Roundup on poison ivy. Mine is
>mostly on the edges in the grass and Roundup kills the competition while
>only burning off the tops of the p.i. so it comes back stronger than ever.
>I used a broadleaf herbicide - harsh maybe - but now it is gone (except
>for a very few new shoots) as the grass that remains helps choke out any
>regeneration and I don't have to re-apply something also harsh, even if it
>is less so, on a continuing basis. Harsh too is the Tordon I use of the
>larger weedy trees and on the Honeysuckle which doesn't pull cleanly. On
>the other hand, a little drop will do you on a cut stump so there is no
>peripheral damage from overspray and, since you can be selective, the
>released native competition takes over the newly opened space. Tordon is
>effective but not in the spring as the rising sap washes it off the stump.
>So I flag the Honeysuckle then and cut it in September when the plant takes
>it down into the roots. This is hot, buggy work  but carries the
>satisfaction of knowing it is more effective than cursing and it makes the
>beer taste great.
>  Originally this job looked to be impossibly overwhelming but with
>diligence in time I have an island of good quality native woods in a sea of
>European weeds. Most of the new buckthorn seedlings come up under the
>mother tree and it is important to first eliminate them. Then, as the woods
>continues to get healthier, it fights off the new invaders from the outside
>in an increasingly more effective way with diminishing help from me. This,
>the four hundredth anniversary of Cervantes, is a great year to celibate by
>beginning to tilt at this windmill. Not all the seemingly Quixotic ventures
>turn out to be so.
>
>Dave
>
>
>> [Original Message]
>> From: bluestem_farm at juno.com bluestem_farm at juno.com>
>> To: nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
>> Date: 5/1/05 10:18:56 PM
>> Subject: Re: [NAFEX] Killing Poison Ivy Organically/elevation
>>
>>
>> Tanis,
>> I've seen p.i. on very dry sand, in oak barrens in and out of the shade,
>and I'm pretty sure that I've seen it in marshes, too.  I think around here
>it may be grazing that keeps it down.  Our farm was pastured fencerow to
>fencerow by cattle and then sheep before we bought it, in the woods and
>everywhere.  And we had virtually no p.i. when we bought it; now it is
>moving in and spreading (along with the autumn olive and other things) such
>that I've been threatening to get some highlander cattle.  Actually I want
>them for the brush control, but if they kept down the poisons that would be
>great.
>> Muffy
>>
>> -- "tanis cuff"  wrote:
>> WI p.ivy doesn't mind cold winters, not much bothered by dry soil either.
>I
>> don't recall seeing it on the driest sand, nor in marshes, otherwise
>"it's
>> everywhere".  Could elevation really be the limiting factor?  Seeds are
>> moved by birds; are they very strict about elevation?
>>
>>
>> On May 1, 2005, at 3:43 PM, Pat Meadows wrote:
>>
>> >We don't seem to have any poison ivy in this area
>> >(Appalachian Mountains in northern Pennsylvania).  It
>> >surprised me, but I have not seen any in four years of
>> >living here and I recognize it when I see it.
>> >
>> >I can only assume the winters are too cold for it (the
>> >lowest temperature we've experienced here is -26 F).
>> >Anyway, it doesn't seem to be here.
>> >
>> >Pat
>> >--
>> >
>>
>> I think you're right about the temperature.  There's a fairly sharp line
>in
>> NH and upstate NY between where the poison ivy grows, and where it
>doesn't.
>> I'm pretty sure it corresponds to winter low temps.  At any rate, I know
>> several places where it grows next to the water, or in the valley, but
>> doesn't grow once you get a little elevation.
>>
>> Ginda
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> nafex mailing list
>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>
>> **YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
>> All other messages are discarded.
>> No exceptions.
>> ----
>> To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be
>used to change other email options):
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>
>> File attachments are NOT stripped by this list
>> TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
>> Please do not send binary files.
>> Use plain text ONLY in emails!
>>
>> Message archives are here:
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex
>>
>> NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/
>>
>>
>> ___________________________________________________________________
>> Speed up your surfing with Juno SpeedBand.
>> Now includes pop-up blocker!
>> Only $14.95/month -visit http://www.juno.com/surf to sign up today!
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> nafex mailing list
>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>
>> **YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
>> All other messages are discarded.
>> No exceptions.
>> ----
>> To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be
>used to change other email options):
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>
>> File attachments are NOT stripped by this list
>> TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
>> Please do not send binary files.
>> Use plain text ONLY in emails!
>>
>> Message archives are here:
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex
>>
>> NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/
>
>
>_______________________________________________
>nafex mailing list
>nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>
>All other messages are discarded.
>No exceptions.
>----
>To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be
used to
change other email options):
>http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>
>File attachments are NOT stripped by this list
>TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
>Please do not send binary files.
>Use plain text ONLY in emails!
>
>Message archives are here:
>http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex
>
>NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/


_______________________________________________
nafex mailing list
nafex at lists.ibiblio.org

**YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
All other messages are discarded.
No exceptions.
----
To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be used
to change other email options):
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex

File attachments are NOT stripped by this list
TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
Please do not send binary files.
Use plain text ONLY in emails!

Message archives are here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex

NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/




More information about the nafex mailing list