[NAFEX] black locust

list at ginda.us list at ginda.us
Sun Mar 16 09:20:06 EST 2003


Earthworms eat leaf duff, and turn it into a finer soil with very 
different moisture-retaining characteristics.  People have measured the 
depth of duff before and after earthworms reach a site, and the 
difference is significant.  There are a number of native plants that 
prefer to grow in deep duff - mostly forest understory shrubs and 
wildflowers, which may be endangered by the spread of earthworms into 
their habitat.

On the other hand (and here I wax political) I am not sure that the 
future will consider our current attempts to maintain "intact" 
ecosystems wise.  Things change.  Even without global warming, 
environments change due to plant succession, local droughts or cold 
snaps or fires, the natural spread of widely adapted plants, the 
accumulation or degradation of various soil nutrients (rain leaches 
stuff, tectonic activity adds stuff) etc.  There's a fairly serious 
theory that the climate and ecosystem of most of Africa was 
dramatically changed by the introduction of rinderpest (a measles-like 
disease of cattle) which wiped out the herds and wealth of the locals 
on the eve of European colonialism, and all those game reserves are 
preserving a recent phenomenon.

I wonder if the best way to preserve some populations of interesting 
plants or animals that are not widely adapted might be to transplant 
them to new habitats, and if we ought to value local genetic diversity 
over "native".  Especially as we stand at the brink of what looks to be 
a major change in many local climates - should we be predicting where 
redwood will thrive in 50 years and start nursing populations there?  
Or importing swallowtails to new stands of pawpaws?

Ginda Fisher

On Sunday, March 16, 2003, at 08:08  AM, Dylan Ford wrote:

> Rick Valley-
>                 I heard long ago that honeybees and earthworms are 
> alien to
> North America, imported by European colonists, and as such are harmful
> elements in our ecosystems, but I have never really understood the case
> against them. Can you (or other Nafexers) spell out the harm they do,
> especially the earthworms?
>         It's a little more obvious with the honeybees in terms of
> competition for resources, but I must admit that I can't figure out on 
> my
> own how earthworms are, as you put it, "destroying our ecology from the
> ground up".
>         Now slugs, on the other hand...
>
>                                                 dylan ford
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Rick Valley" <bamboogrove at cmug.com>
> To: "North American Fruit Explorers" <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Sent: Sunday, March 16, 2003 1:22 AM
> Subject: Re: [NAFEX] black locust
>
>
>> Here in Oregon, Black Locust is not native. Yet although the tree 
>> grows
> well
>> here, it is not a big problem as far as being invasive. Deer will 
>> eagerly
>> consume what they can reach. As far as I have seen, it does not 
>> eliminate
>> other vegetation.
>> And, thank the lord, it does not invade wet prairies like Pear does 
>> here,
> or
>> hybridize with native species, polluting the gene pool, as Apple does
> here.
>> (Should cut 'em all down and burn 'em!) Too bad though, that it feeds
> those
>> wretched, nectar usurping non-native honeybees, which are nothing but 
>> the
>> invertebrate shock troops of biological imperialism. Them and the
>> earthworms, which are destroying our ecology from the ground up.
>> It is the only rot-resistant wood that is feasible to grow here to 
>> harvest
>> size in your lifetime. I have successfully used it in agroforestry 
>> systems
>> for years now. Properly seasoned, the wood is in demand for boat 
>> building
>> and furniture (indoor and out) The wood is not difficult to work 
>> green,
> and
>> as a beam, it's about the strongest you can get in N. Am. There was a
> group
>> in NY state promoting Black Locust forestry, which put out 1 issue of 
>> a
>> "Black Locust Journal" but I don't know what happende to them. I 
>> recommend
>> *Black Locust: Biology Culture and Utilization* (Proceedings of the 
>> Intn'l
>> Conf.) '91, MSU, East Lansing, Mich. There's a New Mexico Locust too,
> which
>> has at least one local population of good timber form. As far as
> fenceposts,
>> it far outlasts oak.
>>
>>>> BUT -- plant them where you can mow around the area. They will 
>>>> sucker
>>>> from the roots and are very invasive. And, the posts are hard to 
>>>> drive
>>>> staples into; I expect it would be hard to drive nails into black
>>>> locust lumber.
>> You can drill and screw it just fine; I get staples into it OK, and
>> sometimes I drill and drive nails through and clench them- works 
>> great. I
>> only get suckers after felling a tree, or after cutting a root (which 
>> I
>> sometimes do purposefully to spread a grove)
>>
>> -Rick in Benton Co. OR
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> nafex mailing list
>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>> Most questions can be answered here:
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>> File attachments are accepted by this list; please do not send binary
> files, plain text ONLY!
>> Message archives are here:
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex
>> To view your user options go to:
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/options/nafex/XXXX@XXXX (where 
>> XXXX at XXXX
> is
>> YOUR email address)
>> NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/
>>
>>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> nafex mailing list
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> Most questions can be answered here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
> File attachments are accepted by this list; please do not send binary 
> files, plain text ONLY!
> Message archives are here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex
> To view your user options go to:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/options/nafex/XXXX@XXXX (where 
> XXXX at XXXX is
> YOUR email address)
> NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/
>



More information about the nafex mailing list