[cc-community] CC on government website

Pete Stott Pete.Stott at Wheel.co.uk
Tue Jul 12 08:02:39 EDT 2005


Evan Wrote:
 
"In the USA, all work generated by government employees is in the public
domain. I take it that's not the case in the UK; IIRC, government work
becomes copyright by Her Majesty, correct?"
 
After reading your reply I thought that there had to be something similar in
the UK. After a little bit of research (which I should of done before the
original post, sorry) I have just discovered that there is something called
"crown copyright":
 
"Crown copyright protected material (other than the Royal Arms and
departmental or agency logos and photography) may be reproduced free of
charge in any format or medium, provided it is reproduced accurately and not
used in a misleading context.
Where any of the Crown copyright items on this site are being republished or
copied to others, the source of the material must be identified and the
copyright status acknowledged."
 
It sounds very much like the attribution CC licence. I wonder why they
didn't just use that?

More information can be found here:
http://www.opsi.gov.uk/advice/crown-copyright/index.htm
<http://www.opsi.gov.uk/advice/crown-copyright/index.htm> 

It seems this form of copyright was only introduced on July 1st 2005!

"The aim of the Regulations is to encourage the re-use of public sector
information by removing obstacles that stand in the way of re-use. The main
themes are improving transparency, fairness and consistency. In doing so it
will help stimulate the development of innovative new information products
and services across Europe, so boosting the information industry."

Genius.

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Evan Prodromou [mailto:evan at bad.dynu.ca]
Sent: 12 July 2005 12:15
To: cc-community at lists.ibiblio.org
Subject: Re: [cc-community] CC on government website


On Tue, 2005-07-12 at 11:05 +0100, Pete Stott wrote: 

Hi,



I'm currently wireframing some content for a savings and investment website

commissioned by the British treasury. [...]



My question is: should I suggest to the client that they place a creative

commons licence on their content? Seeing as the website's mission is to

spread knowledge and raise the profile of certain types of products,

slapping on a copyright statement seems at odds with this.

Doesn't it, though?

In the USA, all work generated by government employees is in the public
domain. I take it that's not the case in the UK; IIRC, government work
becomes copyright by Her Majesty, correct?

A public domain dedication or an Attribution license is probably a great
idea. It's unclear to me if the stipulations of the CC licenses, and/or the
CC licenses for England and Wales ( http://creativecommons.org.uk/)
<http://creativecommons.org.uk/)>  , would work for the British government. 

Also, if you think this is a good idea, have any of you had experience of

selling the CC philosophy to a client.

I haven't, but that sounds like an excellent topic for the Creative Commons
wiki!

~Evan





_____________________________________________________________________
This e-mail has been scanned for viruses by MessageLabs.
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/cc-community/attachments/20050712/ed7b9af5/attachment.html 


More information about the cc-community mailing list