[b-hebrew] Interchange of R/resh with L/lamed in Biblical Hebrew

Isaac Fried if at math.bu.edu
Mon Jun 23 17:41:54 EDT 2008


Jim,

In Genesis 22:9 it is (QD.
The root (QR, 'tear', sometimes referring to the crushing of the sex  
organs as in Genesis 49:6, is a variant of QR(, and a relative of ) 
GR, 'accumulate, stores up', as in Proverbs 6:8, )XR, 'be on top of  
things', and )KR, 'plow', as in Jeremiah 51:23. All these acts refer  
to the breakup of one body or to the aggregation of several bodies.
The root (QL, 'deviate', of Habakkuk 1:4 is a relative of (GL,  
'bent', and GAL, 'mound, wave, hunk'.
The letter R appears often in geometric figures to indicates that  
they are considered made of particles, for instance, HAR, 'mountain'.
As to your question
"Does ayin-qof-resh reflect northern Canaan in the Late Bronze Age?   
Either
over time the R/resh softens to L/lamed, or because of dialectal  
differences
between northern Canaan vs. southern Canaan, in the mid-1st  
millennium BCE we see, coming out of Jerusalem in southern Canaan,  
ayin-qof-lamed.  The resh/R has become lamed/L."
I don't have even the remotest answer.
were did you get this exact figure of fifteen regular years for  
Isaac's age?

Isaac Fried, Boston University

On Jun 23, 2008, at 1:10 PM, JimStinehart at aol.com wrote:

>
> Isaac Fried:
>
> Since it is directly on point, please contrast ayin-qof-resh at  
> Genesis 22: 9
> with ayin-qof-lamed at Habakkuk 1: 4.  The two words are the same in
> unpointed Hebrew, except that one ends with a resh, whereas the  
> other ends with a
> lamed.
>
> Ayin-qof-lamed is usually said to mean bent, twisted, bent out of  
> shape,
> crooked, crooked justice.
>
> Both of these words seem to embody the concept of “bind, twist”, in a
> negative context.
>
> Does ayin-qof-resh reflect northern Canaan in the Late Bronze Age?   
> Either
> over time the R/resh softens to L/lamed, or because of dialectal  
> differences
> between northern Canaan vs. southern Canaan, in the mid-1st  
> millennium BCE we
> see, coming out of Jerusalem in southern Canaan, ayin-qof-lamed.   
> The resh/R has
> become lamed/L.
>
> This seems to me to be a perfect example of exactly the point I am  
> trying to
> make.
>
> Doesn’t it seem logical that a resh/R in northern Canaan in the  
> Late Bronze
> Age may come out, centuries later and much farther south (in  
> Jerusalem), as a
> lamed/L?
>
> That’s precisely the question I am raising.  I think you have come  
> up with a
> 6th example here of this phenomenon, to go along with the 5  
> examples I cited
> in my original post.
>
> Please contrast ayin-qof-resh at Genesis 22: 9 with ayin-qof-lamed at
> Habakkuk 1: 4.
>
> P.S.  In the binding incident, Abraham is age 65 regular years, and  
> Isaac is
> age 15 regular years.  Isaac at first glance might seem a bit naïve  
> and
> passive for being a young adult age 15 regular years, but that  
> perfectly fits his
> character.  Abraham is old, but Abraham is still in good physical  
> shape at this
> point (though not for much longer;  old Abraham ages quickly after  
> Sarah’s
> death, which occurs a few years after the binding incident).  At  
> the time of the
> binding incident, Abraham is age 130 “years”, in terms of the 6- 
> month “years”
>  in which all characters’ ages are set forth in the Patriarchal  
> narratives.
> The numerical symbolism here is that in the Patriarchal narratives  
> (though not
> the case generally in the ancient world), the number 13 is an  
> inauspicious
> number.  Abraham is age 13 tenfold, that is, age 130 “years”, in 6- 
> month “years”
> .  That is the equivalent of age 65 regular years.  We are not  
> explicitly
> told Abraham’s exact age in so many words here in the text, but the  
> foregoing
> analysis fits perfectly with everything that we are told throughout  
> the
> Patriarchal narratives.
>
> Jim Stinehart
> Evanston, Illinois
>
>
>
>
> **************Gas prices getting you down? Search AOL Autos for
> fuel-efficient used cars.      (http://autos.aol.com/used? 
> ncid=aolaut00050000000007)
> _______________________________________________
> b-hebrew mailing list
> b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew




More information about the b-hebrew mailing list