[B-Greek] QEOPNEUSTOS

Mark Lightman lightmanmark at yahoo.com
Thu Apr 22 19:49:51 EDT 2010


Blue wrote:

<As one can see, Philo considers that which God breathes into as being
equivalent to ENEPNEUSEN.
  Also, notice that Philo believes the result
of such inspiration is for our WFELEIAi.
  This would parallel Paul’s
use of WFELIMOS in II Timothy 3:16.>

Excellent parallel, Blue.   I have never seen this pointed out before, but I think a case could be
made that Paul and Philo are at least drawing on common traditions here.  Very well done. 

 Mark L



FWSFOROS MARKOS




________________________________
From: Blue Meeksbay <bluemeeksbay at yahoo.com>
To: George F Somsel <gfsomsel at yahoo.com>
Cc: b-greek at lists.ibiblio.org
Sent: Thu, April 22, 2010 5:27:31 PM
Subject: Re: [B-Greek] QEOPNEUSTOS

George mentioned that QEOPNEUSTOS might as well be a hapax. Except for his quote from Moulton and Milligan he could not find another reference for this word, except for other comments on the passage in question. If this word is so rare, why do we presume Paul (or whoever one thinks wrote II Timothy) was aware of QEOPNEUSTOS as a word? Maybe he coined the word himself, or, at least, thought he *coined* the word himself.
 
If this is true, we are thrown back to context, and, as a Jew, his context would be other occurrences where God breathed into something. Of course, the first thing that comes to mind is the creation of Adam. Perhaps these passages from Philo might help one understand the use of QEOPNEUSTOS by the writer of II Timothy.
 
 TO GE MHN ENEFUSHSEN ISON ESTI TWi ENEPNEUSEN hH EYUCWSE TA AYUCA• MH GAR TOSAUTHS ATOPIAS ANAPLHSQEIHMEN hWSTE NOMISAI QEON STOMATOS hH MUKTHRWN ORGANOIS CRHSQAI PROS TO EMFUSHSAI• APOIOS GAR hO QEOS, OU MONON OUK ANQRWPOMORFOS  Legum allegoriarum 1:36
 
“Now the expression "breathed into" is equivalent to "inspired," or "gave life to" things inanimate: for let us take care that we are never filled with such absurdity as to think that God employs the organs of the mouth or nostrils for the purpose of breathing into anything; for God is not only devoid of peculiar qualities, but he is likewise not of the form of man, and the use of these words shows some more secret mystery of nature…” Legum allegoriarum 1:36  (The Works of Philo Judaeus, the Contemporary of Josephus, Translated from the Greek, C. D. Young, 4 vols., London: Henry G. Bohn, 1854-55)
 
Also this passage from Philo:
 
 
 TOU D᾽ AISQHTOU KAI EPI MEROUS ANQRWPOU THN KATASKEUHN SUNQETON EINAI FHSIN EK TE GEWDOUS OUSIAS KAI PNEUMATOS QEIOU• GEGENHSQAI GAR TO MEN SWMA COUN TOU TECNITOU LABONTOS KAI MORFHN ANQRWPINHN EX AUTOU DIAPLASANTOS, THN DE YUCHN AP᾽ OUDENOS GENHTOU TO PARAPAN, ALL᾽ EK TOU PATROS KAI hHGEMONOS TWN PANTWN• hO GAR ENEFUSHSEN, OUDEN HN hETERON H PNEUMA QEION APO THS MAKARIAS KAI EUDAIMONOS FUSEWS EKEINHS APOIKIAN THN ENQADE STEILAMENON EP᾽ WFELEIAi TOU GENOUS hHMWN.De opificio mundi 1:135
 
 “But he asserts that the formation of the individual man, perceptible by the external senses is a composition of earthy substance, and divine spirit. For that the body was created by the Creator taking a lump of clay, and fashioning the human form out of it; but that the soul proceeds from no created thing at all, but from the Father and Ruler of all things. For when he uses the expression, "he breathed into," etc., he means nothing else than the divine spirit proceeding from that happy and blessed nature, sent to take up its habitation here on earth, for the advantage of our race…” De opificio mundi 1:135 (The Works of Philo Judaeus, the Contemporary of Josephus, Translated from the Greek, C. D. Young, 4 vols., London: Henry G. Bohn, 1854-55)
 
As one can see, Philo considers that which God breathes into as being equivalent to ENEPNEUSEN.  Also, notice that Philo believes the result of such inspiration is for our WFELEIAi.  This would parallel Paul’s use of WFELIMOS in II Timothy 3:16.
 
Perhaps, this might help us understand what might have been in the mind of the writer of II Timothy; obviously, however, this can only be conjecture.  As such, it cannot really answer the original question, but I hope these passages from Philo might provide some additional information, along with the other ones provided by George, so that one can come up with their own conclusions. 
 
Sincerely,
Blue Harris
 




________________________________
From: George F Somsel <gfsomsel at yahoo.com>
To: j.d.ernest at bc.edu; B-GREEK list <b-greek at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: Wed, April 21, 2010 7:32:30 AM
Subject: Re: [B-Greek] QEOPNEUSTOS

Yes, and I'm afraid the rest of the list is almost equally uninformative since it mainly is constituted by quotations of the passage.  It would almost as well be a hapax if this were all we had to go by.  Moulton and Milligan have an entry which is perhaps slightly more helpful in that it isn't Christian and therefore isn't limited simply to a recitation of the passage.

 
θεόπνευστος     2315
Syll55212(ii/b.c.) opens a decree in connexion with the Parthenon at Magnesia with the words θείας ἐπιπνοίας καὶ παραστάσεως γενομένης τῶι σύνπαντι πλήθει τοῦ πολιτ εύματος εἰς τὴν ἀποκατάστασιν τοῦ ναοῦ—a divine “inspiration and desire” which has impelled the people to arise and build to the glory of Artemis. Cf. also Vett. Val. p. 33019ἔστι δέ τι καὶ θεῖον ἐν ἡμῖν θεόπνευστον δημιούργημα.
 
Moulton, J. H., & Milligan, G. (1930). The vocabulary of the Greek Testament. Issued also in eight parts, 1914-1929. (287). London: Hodder and Stoughton.
 
 

 george
gfsomsel 


… search for truth, hear truth, 
learn truth, love truth, speak the truth, hold the truth, 
defend the truth till death.


- Jan Hus
_________ 




________________________________
From: James Ernest <james.ernest at gmail.com>
To: B-GREEK list <b-greek at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: Wed, April 21, 2010 6:06:56 AM
Subject: Re: [B-Greek] QEOPNEUSTOS

The excerpts George cites from a pseudo-Athanasian (late 4th cent? 5th
cent.?) dialogue between one Mr. Orthodox (ORQ.) and one Mr.
Macedonian (MAKED.) appear to be arguing for the divinity of the Holy
Spirit by showing that the PNEUMA must be identified with or included
in the QEOS in QEOPNEUSTOS. They're interesting, but I don't think
they shed any light on CM's question (what does the phrase
[deutero-]Pauline phrase GRAFH QEOPNEUSTOS imply regarding the
inerrancy of Scripture). That's because the author of the dialogue is
arguing, as the Migne title indicates, De sancta trinitate, not De
sacra scriptura.

James Ernest
---
B-Greek home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek
B-Greek mailing list
B-Greek at lists.ibiblio.org
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-greek



      
---
B-Greek home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek
B-Greek mailing list
B-Greek at lists.ibiblio.org
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-greek



      
---
B-Greek home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek
B-Greek mailing list
B-Greek at lists.ibiblio.org
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-greek



      


More information about the B-Greek mailing list